Turbulent deflagrations, autoignitions, and detonations

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562312
Title:
Turbulent deflagrations, autoignitions, and detonations
Authors:
Bradley, Derek; Lawes, Malcolm; Mansour, Morkous S. ( 0000-0002-5002-1403 )
Abstract:
Measurements of turbulent burning velocities in fan-stirred explosion bombs show an initial linear increase with the fan speed and RMS turbulent velocity. The line then bends over to form a plateau of high values around the maximum attainable burning velocity. A further increase in fan speed leads to the eventual complete quenching of the flame due to increasing localised extinctions because of the flame stretch rate. The greater the Markstein number, the more readily does flame quenching occur. Flame propagation along a duct closed at one end, with and without baffles to increase the turbulence, is subjected to a one-dimensional analysis. The flame, initiated at the closed end of the long duct, accelerates by the turbulent feedback mechanism, creating a shock wave ahead of it, until the maximum turbulent burning velocity for the mixture is attained. With the confining walls, the mixture is compressed between the flame and the shock plane up to the point where it might autoignite. This can be followed by a deflagration to detonation transition. The maximum shock intensity occurs with the maximum attainable turbulent burning velocity, and this defines the limit for autoignition of the mixture. For more reactive mixtures, autoignition can occur at turbulent burning velocities that are less than the maximum attainable one. Autoignition can be followed by quasi-detonation or fully developed detonation. The stability of ensuing detonations is discussed, along with the conditions that may lead to their extinction. © 2012 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Mechanical Engineering Program; Clean Combustion Research Center
Publisher:
Pleiades Publishing Ltd
Journal:
Combustion, Explosion, and Shock Waves
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
DOI:
10.1134/S0010508212050048
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00105082
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Mechanical Engineering Program; Clean Combustion Research Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Dereken
dc.contributor.authorLawes, Malcolmen
dc.contributor.authorMansour, Morkous S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:00:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:00:26Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.identifier.issn00105082en
dc.identifier.doi10.1134/S0010508212050048en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562312en
dc.description.abstractMeasurements of turbulent burning velocities in fan-stirred explosion bombs show an initial linear increase with the fan speed and RMS turbulent velocity. The line then bends over to form a plateau of high values around the maximum attainable burning velocity. A further increase in fan speed leads to the eventual complete quenching of the flame due to increasing localised extinctions because of the flame stretch rate. The greater the Markstein number, the more readily does flame quenching occur. Flame propagation along a duct closed at one end, with and without baffles to increase the turbulence, is subjected to a one-dimensional analysis. The flame, initiated at the closed end of the long duct, accelerates by the turbulent feedback mechanism, creating a shock wave ahead of it, until the maximum turbulent burning velocity for the mixture is attained. With the confining walls, the mixture is compressed between the flame and the shock plane up to the point where it might autoignite. This can be followed by a deflagration to detonation transition. The maximum shock intensity occurs with the maximum attainable turbulent burning velocity, and this defines the limit for autoignition of the mixture. For more reactive mixtures, autoignition can occur at turbulent burning velocities that are less than the maximum attainable one. Autoignition can be followed by quasi-detonation or fully developed detonation. The stability of ensuing detonations is discussed, along with the conditions that may lead to their extinction. © 2012 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.en
dc.publisherPleiades Publishing Ltden
dc.subjectAutoignitionsen
dc.subjectDetonationsen
dc.subjectFlame quenchingen
dc.subjectTurbulent deflagrationsen
dc.titleTurbulent deflagrations, autoignitions, and detonationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.identifier.journalCombustion, Explosion, and Shock Wavesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdomen
kaust.authorMansour, Morkous S.en
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