Seawater ultrafiltration fouling control: Backwashing with demineralized water/SWRO permeate

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562305
Title:
Seawater ultrafiltration fouling control: Backwashing with demineralized water/SWRO permeate
Authors:
Li, Sheng; Heijman, Sebastiaan G J; Verberk, J. Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.
Abstract:
In this study, the effect of demineralized water backwashing on fouling control of seawater ultrafiltration was investigated. Seawater from Scheveningen beach in The Hague and a desalination plant of Evides Company at Zeeland in the Netherlands was used as feed water, while demineralized water and UF permeate were used as backwash water for a fouling control efficiency comparison under different fluxes and backwash durations. Furthermore, demineralized waters with 5 or 50 mmol/l NaCl were applied for backwashing as well, to check the influence of monovalent cations on UF fouling control. Additionally, SWRO permeate was used for backwashes in long-term experiments to check the possibility of it replacing demineralized water. Results show that seawater UF fouling control is substantially improved by demineralized water backwashing. However, due to the high salinity of seawater, more water was required to dilute the cation concentration and limit the dispersion effect near the membrane surface than was needed for surface water. A 2-min demineralized water backwash showed better fouling control efficiency than a 1-min backwash. Furthermore, the presence of monovalent cations in the backwash water deteriorated the fouling control efficiency of the backwash, indicating the existence of a charge screening effect. The demineralized water with 5 and 50 mmol/l NaCl both showed a similar fouling control efficiency which is better than the UF permeate backwash. The calcium ions in UF permeate probably deteriorates the fouling control efficiency by maintaining a Ca-bridging effect between the membranes and NOM. SWRO permeate backwashing successfully controls membrane fouling as well. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Separation and Purification Technology
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.seppur.2012.07.002
Type:
Article
ISSN:
13835866
Sponsors:
This research was funded by Senter Novem in the framework of the Innowator grants. Norit X-Flow B.V., the membrane manufacturer, the Netherlands, is gratefully acknowledged for providing UFC M5 0.8 membrane fibers. Evides. B.V. and Hatenboer-water. B.V. are appreciated for the cooperation in the DEMIFLUSH project.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shengen
dc.contributor.authorHeijman, Sebastiaan G Jen
dc.contributor.authorVerberk, J. Q J Cen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Dijk, Johannis C.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T10:00:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T10:00:12Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.identifier.issn13835866en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seppur.2012.07.002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562305en
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the effect of demineralized water backwashing on fouling control of seawater ultrafiltration was investigated. Seawater from Scheveningen beach in The Hague and a desalination plant of Evides Company at Zeeland in the Netherlands was used as feed water, while demineralized water and UF permeate were used as backwash water for a fouling control efficiency comparison under different fluxes and backwash durations. Furthermore, demineralized waters with 5 or 50 mmol/l NaCl were applied for backwashing as well, to check the influence of monovalent cations on UF fouling control. Additionally, SWRO permeate was used for backwashes in long-term experiments to check the possibility of it replacing demineralized water. Results show that seawater UF fouling control is substantially improved by demineralized water backwashing. However, due to the high salinity of seawater, more water was required to dilute the cation concentration and limit the dispersion effect near the membrane surface than was needed for surface water. A 2-min demineralized water backwash showed better fouling control efficiency than a 1-min backwash. Furthermore, the presence of monovalent cations in the backwash water deteriorated the fouling control efficiency of the backwash, indicating the existence of a charge screening effect. The demineralized water with 5 and 50 mmol/l NaCl both showed a similar fouling control efficiency which is better than the UF permeate backwash. The calcium ions in UF permeate probably deteriorates the fouling control efficiency by maintaining a Ca-bridging effect between the membranes and NOM. SWRO permeate backwashing successfully controls membrane fouling as well. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by Senter Novem in the framework of the Innowator grants. Norit X-Flow B.V., the membrane manufacturer, the Netherlands, is gratefully acknowledged for providing UFC M5 0.8 membrane fibers. Evides. B.V. and Hatenboer-water. B.V. are appreciated for the cooperation in the DEMIFLUSH project.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBackwashen
dc.subjectDemineralized wateren
dc.subjectDesalinationen
dc.subjectUltrafiltrationen
dc.titleSeawater ultrafiltration fouling control: Backwashing with demineralized water/SWRO permeateen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalSeparation and Purification Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDelft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5048, 2600 GA Delft, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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