Mosquito management in the face of natural selection

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562292
Title:
Mosquito management in the face of natural selection
Authors:
Agusto, Folashade B.; Bewick, Sharon A.; Parshad, Rana ( 0000-0001-7443-8927 )
Abstract:
The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an appealing method for managing mosquito populations while avoiding the environmental and social costs associated with more traditional control strategies like insecticide application. Success of SIT, however, hinges on sterile males being able to compete for females. As a result, heavy and/or continued use of SIT could potentially diminish its efficacy if prolonged treatments result in selection for female preference against sterile males. In this paper we extend a general differential equation model of mosquito dynamics to consider the role of female choosiness in determining the long-term usefulness of SIT as a management option. We then apply optimal control theory to our model and show how natural selection for female choosiness fundamentally alters management strategies. Our study calls into question the benefits associated with developing SIT as a management strategy, and suggests that effort should be spent studying female mate choice in order to determine its relative importance and how likely it is to impact SIT treatment goals. © 2012.
KAUST Department:
Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Program; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Mathematical Biosciences
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.mbs.2012.05.001
PubMed ID:
22617381
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00255564
Sponsors:
The authors acknowledge the useful discussions with Dr. Suzanne Lenhart. One of the authors FBA conducted part of the work as a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIMBioS, SB conducted the work as a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIMBioS and RDP was assisted by attendance as a Short-term Visitor at NIMBioS. National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) is an Institute sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture through NSF Award #EF-0832858, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Program; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAgusto, Folashade B.en
dc.contributor.authorBewick, Sharon A.en
dc.contributor.authorParshad, Ranaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:59:38Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:59:38Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.identifier.issn00255564en
dc.identifier.pmid22617381en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mbs.2012.05.001en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562292en
dc.description.abstractThe sterile insect technique (SIT) is an appealing method for managing mosquito populations while avoiding the environmental and social costs associated with more traditional control strategies like insecticide application. Success of SIT, however, hinges on sterile males being able to compete for females. As a result, heavy and/or continued use of SIT could potentially diminish its efficacy if prolonged treatments result in selection for female preference against sterile males. In this paper we extend a general differential equation model of mosquito dynamics to consider the role of female choosiness in determining the long-term usefulness of SIT as a management option. We then apply optimal control theory to our model and show how natural selection for female choosiness fundamentally alters management strategies. Our study calls into question the benefits associated with developing SIT as a management strategy, and suggests that effort should be spent studying female mate choice in order to determine its relative importance and how likely it is to impact SIT treatment goals. © 2012.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge the useful discussions with Dr. Suzanne Lenhart. One of the authors FBA conducted part of the work as a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIMBioS, SB conducted the work as a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIMBioS and RDP was assisted by attendance as a Short-term Visitor at NIMBioS. National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) is an Institute sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture through NSF Award #EF-0832858, with additional support from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectFemale mate choiceen
dc.subjectMosquitoesen
dc.subjectNatural selectionen
dc.subjectOptimal controlen
dc.subjectPontryagin's maximum principleen
dc.titleMosquito management in the face of natural selectionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Mathematics and Computational Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalMathematical Biosciencesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mathematics, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN 37044, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Knoxville, TN 37996, United Statesen
kaust.authorParshad, Ranaen

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