Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562255
Title:
Short-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling control
Authors:
Miller, Daniel J.; Araújo, Paula A.; Correia, Patrícia B.; Ramsey, Matthew M.; Kruithof, Joop C.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Freeman, Benny Dean; Paul, Donald; Whiteley, Marvin; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
Ultrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Aug-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2012.03.058
PubMed ID:
22578432
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Sponsors:
The authors are grateful for support from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (0648993) and the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Layered Polymeric Systems (DMR-0423914). Part of the work was performed by Wetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs. The authors like to thank the participants of the Wetsus research theme "biofouling" and Evides water-bedrijf for the fruitful discussions and their financial support. In addition, Florian Beyer, Harm van der Kooi, Wim Borgonje and Arie Zwijnenburg are thanked for their contribution to the experimental studies. Andrew Ellington at the University of Texas at Austin is acknowledged for his assistance with the fluorescent protein adhesion tests.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Daniel J.en
dc.contributor.authorAraújo, Paula A.en
dc.contributor.authorCorreia, Patrícia B.en
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Matthew M.en
dc.contributor.authorKruithof, Joop C.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Benny Deanen
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Donalden
dc.contributor.authorWhiteley, Marvinen
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:58:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:58:13Zen
dc.date.issued2012-08en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid22578432en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2012.03.058en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562255en
dc.description.abstractUltrafiltration, nanofiltration membranes and feed spacers were hydrophilized with polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes was evaluated by short-term batch protein and bacterial adhesion tests. The fouling propensity of modified and unmodified membranes and spacers was evaluated by continuous biofouling experiments in a membrane fouling simulator. The goals of the study were: 1) to determine the effectiveness of polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) membrane coatings for biofouling control and 2) to compare techniques commonly used in assessment of membrane biofouling propensity with biofouling experiments under practical conditions. Short-term adhesion tests were carried out under static, no-flow conditions for 1 h using bovine serum albumin, a common model globular protein, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common model Gram-negative bacterium. Biofouling tests were performed in a membrane fouling simulator (MFS) for several days under flow conditions similar to those encountered in industrial modules with the autochthonous drinking water population and acetate dosage as organic substrate. Polydopamine- and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol)-modified membranes showed significantly reduced adhesion of bovine serum albumin and P. aeruginosa in the short-term adhesion tests, but no reduction of biofouling was observed during longer biofouling experiments with modified membranes and spacers. These results demonstrate that short-term batch adhesion experiments using model proteins or bacteria under static conditions are not indicative of biofouling, while continuous biofouling experiments showed that membrane surface modification by polydopamine and polydopamine- g-poly(ethylene glycol) is not effective for biofouling control. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are grateful for support from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (0648993) and the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Layered Polymeric Systems (DMR-0423914). Part of the work was performed by Wetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs. The authors like to thank the participants of the Wetsus research theme "biofouling" and Evides water-bedrijf for the fruitful discussions and their financial support. In addition, Florian Beyer, Harm van der Kooi, Wim Borgonje and Arie Zwijnenburg are thanked for their contribution to the experimental studies. Andrew Ellington at the University of Texas at Austin is acknowledged for his assistance with the fluorescent protein adhesion tests.en
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectBiofilm controlen
dc.subjectBSAen
dc.subjectNFen
dc.subjectPEGen
dc.subjectROen
dc.subjectSurface modificationen
dc.subjectUFen
dc.titleShort-term adhesion and long-term biofouling testing of polydopamine and poly(ethylene glycol) surface modifications of membranes and feed spacers for biofouling controlen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Center for Energy and Environmental Resources, 10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX, 78758, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biological Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, 1 University Station, Austin, TX, 78712, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
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