Apple hypanthium firmness: New insights from comparative proteomics

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562223
Title:
Apple hypanthium firmness: New insights from comparative proteomics
Authors:
Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine
Abstract:
Fruit firmness constitutes an important textural property and is one of the key parameters for estimating ripening and shelf life, which has a major impact on commercialization. In order to decipher the mechanisms related to firmness of apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to compare the total proteome of high and low firmness phenotypes from apple hypanthia of a 'Golden Delicious' × 'Dietrich' population. A total of 36 differentially regulated protein spots were positively identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and then validated against the Malus expressed sequence tags (EST) database. The findings of this study indicated a lower expression of ethylene biosynthesis related proteins in the high firmness phenotype, which could be linked to the slowing down of the ripening and softening processes. The reduced accumulation of proteins involved in ethylene biosynthesis juxtaposed to the upregulation of a transposase and a GTP-binding protein in the high firmness phenotype. The results also showed higher expression of cytoskeleton proteins in the high firmness phenotype compared to the low firmness phenotype, which play a role in maintaining cell structure and possibly fruit integrity. Finally, a number of proteins involved in detoxification and defense were expressed in fruit hypanthium. This proteomic study provides a contribution towards a better understanding of regulatory networks involved in fruit hypanthium firmness and/or softening, which could be instrumental in the development of improved fruit quality. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Core Labs
Publisher:
Humana Press
Journal:
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Issue Date:
26-Jun-2012
DOI:
10.1007/s12010-012-9774-9
PubMed ID:
22733236
Type:
Article
ISSN:
02732289
Sponsors:
This work was supported by grants from the Agricultural Research Council and Technology for Human Resources for Industry Programme, South Africa. The authors wish to thank Prof. Christoph Gehring for critically reading the manuscript and the Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, South Africa for assistance with proteomics equipment used in the study.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMarondedze, Claudiusen
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Ludivineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:57:00Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:57:00Zen
dc.date.issued2012-06-26en
dc.identifier.issn02732289en
dc.identifier.pmid22733236en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12010-012-9774-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562223en
dc.description.abstractFruit firmness constitutes an important textural property and is one of the key parameters for estimating ripening and shelf life, which has a major impact on commercialization. In order to decipher the mechanisms related to firmness of apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to compare the total proteome of high and low firmness phenotypes from apple hypanthia of a 'Golden Delicious' × 'Dietrich' population. A total of 36 differentially regulated protein spots were positively identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and then validated against the Malus expressed sequence tags (EST) database. The findings of this study indicated a lower expression of ethylene biosynthesis related proteins in the high firmness phenotype, which could be linked to the slowing down of the ripening and softening processes. The reduced accumulation of proteins involved in ethylene biosynthesis juxtaposed to the upregulation of a transposase and a GTP-binding protein in the high firmness phenotype. The results also showed higher expression of cytoskeleton proteins in the high firmness phenotype compared to the low firmness phenotype, which play a role in maintaining cell structure and possibly fruit integrity. Finally, a number of proteins involved in detoxification and defense were expressed in fruit hypanthium. This proteomic study provides a contribution towards a better understanding of regulatory networks involved in fruit hypanthium firmness and/or softening, which could be instrumental in the development of improved fruit quality. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants from the Agricultural Research Council and Technology for Human Resources for Industry Programme, South Africa. The authors wish to thank Prof. Christoph Gehring for critically reading the manuscript and the Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, South Africa for assistance with proteomics equipment used in the study.en
dc.publisherHumana Pressen
dc.subjectCytoskeletonen
dc.subjectEthylene biosynthesisen
dc.subjectFruit firmnessen
dc.subjectHypanthiumen
dc.subjectProteomicsen
dc.subjectTwo-dimensional electrophoresisen
dc.titleApple hypanthium firmness: New insights from comparative proteomicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentCore Labsen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Biochemistry and Biotechnologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7535 Cape Town, South Africaen
kaust.authorMarondedze, Claudiusen
kaust.authorThomas, Ludivineen

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