Characterization of secondary treated effluents for tertiary membrane filtration and water recycling

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562214
Title:
Characterization of secondary treated effluents for tertiary membrane filtration and water recycling
Authors:
Ayache, C.; Pidou, Marc; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Poussade, Yvan; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Tazi-Pain, Annie; Keller, Jurg R.
Abstract:
This study evaluates the impacts of water quality from three different secondary effluents on low pressure membrane fouling. Effluent organic matter (EfOM) has been reported by previous studies as responsible for membrane fouling. However, the contribution of the different components of EfOM to membrane fouling is still not well understood. In order to improve and optimize treatment processes, characterization and quantification of the organic matter are important. The characterization methods used in this study are liquid chromatography coupled with an organic detector (LC-OCD) and excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEM). A bench-scale hollow fibre membrane system was used to identify the type of fouling depending on the feed water quality. Results showed no measurable dissolved organic carbon removal by the membranes for the three secondary effluents. Biopolymers and humic-like substances found in different proportions in the three effluents were partially retained by the membranes and were identified to contribute significantly to the flux decline of the low pressure membranes. The observed fouling was determined to be reversible by hydraulic backwashing for two effluents and only by chemical cleaning for the third effluent. © IWA Publishing 2012.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
IWA Publishing
Journal:
Journal of Water Reuse and Desalination
Issue Date:
Jun-2012
DOI:
10.2166/wrd.2012.017
Type:
Article
ISSN:
22201319
Sponsors:
The authors want to specifically acknowledge Veolia Environnement Recherche et Innovation and Seqwater for funding received through the 'Chair in Water Recycling' agreement within the University of Queensland and the FAST programme for funding the 'Optimization of biological pretreatment to limit UF/MF and RO fouling and maximise retention of organic contaminants'. The authors want to particularly thank Dr Alice Antony from the University of New South Wales for performing LC-OCD analyses. The authors would also like to acknowledge Unity Water and Allconnex Water for their support.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAyache, C.en
dc.contributor.authorPidou, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorGernjak, Wolfgangen
dc.contributor.authorPoussade, Yvanen
dc.contributor.authorCroue, Jean-Philippeen
dc.contributor.authorTazi-Pain, Annieen
dc.contributor.authorKeller, Jurg R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:56:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:56:36Zen
dc.date.issued2012-06en
dc.identifier.issn22201319en
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/wrd.2012.017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562214en
dc.description.abstractThis study evaluates the impacts of water quality from three different secondary effluents on low pressure membrane fouling. Effluent organic matter (EfOM) has been reported by previous studies as responsible for membrane fouling. However, the contribution of the different components of EfOM to membrane fouling is still not well understood. In order to improve and optimize treatment processes, characterization and quantification of the organic matter are important. The characterization methods used in this study are liquid chromatography coupled with an organic detector (LC-OCD) and excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEM). A bench-scale hollow fibre membrane system was used to identify the type of fouling depending on the feed water quality. Results showed no measurable dissolved organic carbon removal by the membranes for the three secondary effluents. Biopolymers and humic-like substances found in different proportions in the three effluents were partially retained by the membranes and were identified to contribute significantly to the flux decline of the low pressure membranes. The observed fouling was determined to be reversible by hydraulic backwashing for two effluents and only by chemical cleaning for the third effluent. © IWA Publishing 2012.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors want to specifically acknowledge Veolia Environnement Recherche et Innovation and Seqwater for funding received through the 'Chair in Water Recycling' agreement within the University of Queensland and the FAST programme for funding the 'Optimization of biological pretreatment to limit UF/MF and RO fouling and maximise retention of organic contaminants'. The authors want to particularly thank Dr Alice Antony from the University of New South Wales for performing LC-OCD analyses. The authors would also like to acknowledge Unity Water and Allconnex Water for their support.en
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen
dc.subjectExcitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopyen
dc.subjectLiquid chromatography organic carbon detectoren
dc.subjectMembrane foulingen
dc.subjectUltra-filtrationen
dc.subjectWater recyclingen
dc.titleCharacterization of secondary treated effluents for tertiary membrane filtration and water recyclingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Water Reuse and Desalinationen
dc.contributor.institutionThe University of Queensland, Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC), St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionVeolia Environnement Recherche et Innovation, Chemin de la Digue, 78603 Maisons Laffitte, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionLCEE ENSIP, Université de Poitiers, 40 avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionVeolia Water Australia, PO Box 10819, Adelaide St Post Office, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australiaen
kaust.authorCroue, Jean-Philippeen
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