Quantitative measurement and visualization of biofilm O 2 consumption rates in membrane filtration systems

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562106
Title:
Quantitative measurement and visualization of biofilm O 2 consumption rates in membrane filtration systems
Authors:
Prest, Emmanuelle I E C; Staal, Marc J.; Kühl, Michael; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
There is a strong need for techniques enabling direct assessment of biological activity of biofouling in membrane filtration systems. Here we present a new quantitative and non-destructive method for mapping O 2 dynamics in biofilms during biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators (MFS). Transparent planar O 2 optodes in combination with a luminescence lifetime imaging system were used to map the two-dimensional distribution of O 2 concentrations and consumption rates inside the MFS. The O 2 distribution was indicative for biofilm development. Biofilm activity was characterized by imaging of O 2 consumption rates, where low and high activity areas could be clearly distinguished. The spatial development of O 2 consumption rates, flow channels and stagnant areas could be determined. This can be used for studies on concentration polarization, i.e. salt accumulation at the membrane surface resulting in increased salt passage and reduced water flux. The new optode-based O 2 imaging technique applied to MFS allows non-destructive and spatially resolved quantitative biological activity measurements (BAM) for on-site biofouling diagnosis and laboratory studies. The following set of complementary tools is now available to study development and control of biofouling in membrane systems: (i) MFS, (ii) sensitive pressure drop measurement, (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, (iv) numerical modelling, and (v) biological activity measurement based on O 2 imaging methodology. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of Membrane Science
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.memsci.2011.12.003
Type:
Article
ISSN:
03767388
Sponsors:
This work was performed by Wetsus, centre of excellence for sustainable water technology, Delft University of Technology and the Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Copenhagen. Wetsus is funded by the Ministry of Economic Affairs. Additional support was due to grants from the Danish Natural Science Research Council (M. S., M. K.). The authors thank the participants of the Wetsus theme 'Biofouling' for the fruitful discussions and their financial support.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrest, Emmanuelle I E Cen
dc.contributor.authorStaal, Marc J.en
dc.contributor.authorKühl, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:44:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:44:55Zen
dc.date.issued2012-03en
dc.identifier.issn03767388en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.memsci.2011.12.003en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562106en
dc.description.abstractThere is a strong need for techniques enabling direct assessment of biological activity of biofouling in membrane filtration systems. Here we present a new quantitative and non-destructive method for mapping O 2 dynamics in biofilms during biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators (MFS). Transparent planar O 2 optodes in combination with a luminescence lifetime imaging system were used to map the two-dimensional distribution of O 2 concentrations and consumption rates inside the MFS. The O 2 distribution was indicative for biofilm development. Biofilm activity was characterized by imaging of O 2 consumption rates, where low and high activity areas could be clearly distinguished. The spatial development of O 2 consumption rates, flow channels and stagnant areas could be determined. This can be used for studies on concentration polarization, i.e. salt accumulation at the membrane surface resulting in increased salt passage and reduced water flux. The new optode-based O 2 imaging technique applied to MFS allows non-destructive and spatially resolved quantitative biological activity measurements (BAM) for on-site biofouling diagnosis and laboratory studies. The following set of complementary tools is now available to study development and control of biofouling in membrane systems: (i) MFS, (ii) sensitive pressure drop measurement, (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, (iv) numerical modelling, and (v) biological activity measurement based on O 2 imaging methodology. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was performed by Wetsus, centre of excellence for sustainable water technology, Delft University of Technology and the Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Copenhagen. Wetsus is funded by the Ministry of Economic Affairs. Additional support was due to grants from the Danish Natural Science Research Council (M. S., M. K.). The authors thank the participants of the Wetsus theme 'Biofouling' for the fruitful discussions and their financial support.en
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectBiological activity measurementen
dc.subjectConcentration polarizationen
dc.subjectFlow channelsen
dc.subjectNon-destructive biofouling diagnosisen
dc.subjectOptodeen
dc.titleQuantitative measurement and visualization of biofilm O 2 consumption rates in membrane filtration systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Membrane Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Biological Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, DK-3000 Helsingør, Denmarken
dc.contributor.institutionPlant Functional Biology and Climate Change Cluster, Department of Environmental Science, University of Technology Sydney, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSingapore Center for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singaporeen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
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