Flux patterns and membrane fouling propensity during desalination of seawater by forward osmosis

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/562041
Title:
Flux patterns and membrane fouling propensity during desalination of seawater by forward osmosis
Authors:
Li, Zhenyu; Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo ( 0000-0003-3790-3249 ) ; Li, Qingyu; Zhan, Tong; Amy, Gary L.
Abstract:
The membrane fouling propensity of natural seawater during forward osmosis was studied. Seawater from the Red Sea was used as the feed in a forward osmosis process while a 2. M sodium chloride solution was used as the draw solution. The process was conducted in a semi-batch mode under two crossflow velocities, 16.7. cm/s and 4.2. cm/s. For the first time reported, silica scaling was found to be the dominant inorganic fouling (scaling) on the surface of membrane active layer during seawater forward osmosis. Polymerization of dissolved silica was the major mechanism for the formation of silica scaling. After ten batches of seawater forward osmosis, the membrane surface was covered by a fouling layer of assorted polymerized silica clusters and natural organic matter, especially biopolymers. Moreover, the absorbed biopolymers also provided bacterial attachment sites. The accumulated organic fouling could be partially removed by water flushing while the polymerized silica was difficult to remove. The rate of flux decline was about 53% with a crossflow velocity of 16.7. cm/s while reaching more than 70% with a crossflow velocity of 4.2. cm/s. Both concentration polarization and fouling played roles in the decrease of flux. The salt rejection was stable at about 98% during seawater forward osmosis. In addition, an almost complete rejection of natural organic matter was attained. The results from this study are valuable for the design and development of a successful protocol for a pretreatment process before seawater forward osmosis and a cleaning method for fouled membranes. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
Jan-2012
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2011.10.051
PubMed ID:
22094000
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhenyuen
dc.contributor.authorYangali-Quintanilla, Victoren
dc.contributor.authorValladares Linares, Rodrigoen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qingyuen
dc.contributor.authorZhan, Tongen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:43:25Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:43:25Zen
dc.date.issued2012-01en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid22094000en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2011.10.051en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/562041en
dc.description.abstractThe membrane fouling propensity of natural seawater during forward osmosis was studied. Seawater from the Red Sea was used as the feed in a forward osmosis process while a 2. M sodium chloride solution was used as the draw solution. The process was conducted in a semi-batch mode under two crossflow velocities, 16.7. cm/s and 4.2. cm/s. For the first time reported, silica scaling was found to be the dominant inorganic fouling (scaling) on the surface of membrane active layer during seawater forward osmosis. Polymerization of dissolved silica was the major mechanism for the formation of silica scaling. After ten batches of seawater forward osmosis, the membrane surface was covered by a fouling layer of assorted polymerized silica clusters and natural organic matter, especially biopolymers. Moreover, the absorbed biopolymers also provided bacterial attachment sites. The accumulated organic fouling could be partially removed by water flushing while the polymerized silica was difficult to remove. The rate of flux decline was about 53% with a crossflow velocity of 16.7. cm/s while reaching more than 70% with a crossflow velocity of 4.2. cm/s. Both concentration polarization and fouling played roles in the decrease of flux. The salt rejection was stable at about 98% during seawater forward osmosis. In addition, an almost complete rejection of natural organic matter was attained. The results from this study are valuable for the design and development of a successful protocol for a pretreatment process before seawater forward osmosis and a cleaning method for fouled membranes. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectForward osmosisen
dc.subjectFoulingen
dc.subjectNatural organic matteren
dc.subjectScalingen
dc.subjectSeawateren
dc.titleFlux patterns and membrane fouling propensity during desalination of seawater by forward osmosisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
kaust.authorLi, Zhenyuen
kaust.authorYangali-Quintanilla, Victoren
kaust.authorValladares Linares, Rodrigoen
kaust.authorLi, Qingyuen
kaust.authorZhan, Tongen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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