The making of a splash

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561959
Title:
The making of a splash
Authors:
Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T. ( 0000-0001-6997-4311 )
Abstract:
The splash resulting from the impact of a drop onto a pool is a particularly beautiful manifestation of a canonical problem, where a mass of fluid breaks up into smaller pieces. Despite over a century of experimental study, the splashing mechanics have eluded full description, the details often being obscured by the very rapid motions and small length scales involved. Zhang et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 690, 2012, pp. 515) introduce a powerful new tool to the experimental arsenal, when they apply X-ray imaging to study the fine ejecta sheets which emerge during the earliest contact of the drop. Their images reveal hidden details and complex underlying dynamics, which will directly affect the size and velocity of the splashing droplets. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.
KAUST Department:
Clean Combustion Research Center; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Mechanical Engineering Program; High-Speed Fluids Imaging Laboratory
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Journal:
Journal of Fluid Mechanics
Issue Date:
20-Dec-2011
DOI:
10.1017/jfm.2011.458
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00221120
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Mechanical Engineering Program; Clean Combustion Research Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThoroddsen, Sigurdur T.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:35:03Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:35:03Zen
dc.date.issued2011-12-20en
dc.identifier.issn00221120en
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/jfm.2011.458en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561959en
dc.description.abstractThe splash resulting from the impact of a drop onto a pool is a particularly beautiful manifestation of a canonical problem, where a mass of fluid breaks up into smaller pieces. Despite over a century of experimental study, the splashing mechanics have eluded full description, the details often being obscured by the very rapid motions and small length scales involved. Zhang et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 690, 2012, pp. 515) introduce a powerful new tool to the experimental arsenal, when they apply X-ray imaging to study the fine ejecta sheets which emerge during the earliest contact of the drop. Their images reveal hidden details and complex underlying dynamics, which will directly affect the size and velocity of the splashing droplets. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.en
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)en
dc.titleThe making of a splashen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentHigh-Speed Fluids Imaging Laboratoryen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Fluid Mechanicsen
kaust.authorThoroddsen, Sigurdur T.en
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