Differences in demographic traits of four butterflyfish species between two reefs of the Great Barrier Reef separated by 1,200 km

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561923
Title:
Differences in demographic traits of four butterflyfish species between two reefs of the Great Barrier Reef separated by 1,200 km
Authors:
Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 ) ; Laman Trip, Elizabeth; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Choat, John Howard
Abstract:
Many species demonstrate variation in life history attributes in response to gradients in environmental conditions. For fishes, major drivers of life history variation are changes in temperature and food availability. This study examined large-scale variation in the demography of four species of butterflyfishes (Chaetodon citrinellus, Chaetodon lunulatus, Chaetodon melannotus, and Chaetodon trifascialis) between two locations on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (Lizard Island and One Tree Island, separated by approximately 1,200 km). Variation in age-based demographic parameters was assessed using the re-parameterised von Bertalanffy growth function. All species displayed measurable differences in body size between locations, with individuals achieving a larger adult size at the higher latitude site (One Tree Island) for three of the four species examined. Resources and abundances of the study species were also measured, revealing some significant differences between locations. For example, for C. trifascialis, there was no difference in its preferred resource or in abundance between locations, yet it achieved a larger body size at the higher latitude location, suggesting a response to temperature. For some species, resources and abundances did vary between locations, limiting the ability to distinguish between a demographic response to temperature as opposed to a response to food or competition. Future studies of life histories and demographics at large spatial scales will need to consider the potentially confounding roles of temperature, resource usage and availability, and abundance/competition to disentangle the effects of these environmental variables. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Reef Ecology Lab
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Coral Reefs
Issue Date:
16-Nov-2011
DOI:
10.1007/s00338-011-0838-z
Type:
Article
ISSN:
07224028
Sponsors:
The authors thank D DeVere, J Pitt, and WD Robbins for field assistance. We are also grateful to the staff of Lizard Island and One Tree Island Research Stations for logistic support. Comments from two anonymous reviewers and PL Munday greatly improved the manuscript. This work was supported by a National Science Foundation (USA) Graduate Research Fellowship (MLB) and by PADI Project A. W. A. R. E. (MLB).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorLaman Trip, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorPratchett, Morgan S.en
dc.contributor.authorChoat, John Howarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:34:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:34:12Zen
dc.date.issued2011-11-16en
dc.identifier.issn07224028en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00338-011-0838-zen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561923en
dc.description.abstractMany species demonstrate variation in life history attributes in response to gradients in environmental conditions. For fishes, major drivers of life history variation are changes in temperature and food availability. This study examined large-scale variation in the demography of four species of butterflyfishes (Chaetodon citrinellus, Chaetodon lunulatus, Chaetodon melannotus, and Chaetodon trifascialis) between two locations on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (Lizard Island and One Tree Island, separated by approximately 1,200 km). Variation in age-based demographic parameters was assessed using the re-parameterised von Bertalanffy growth function. All species displayed measurable differences in body size between locations, with individuals achieving a larger adult size at the higher latitude site (One Tree Island) for three of the four species examined. Resources and abundances of the study species were also measured, revealing some significant differences between locations. For example, for C. trifascialis, there was no difference in its preferred resource or in abundance between locations, yet it achieved a larger body size at the higher latitude location, suggesting a response to temperature. For some species, resources and abundances did vary between locations, limiting the ability to distinguish between a demographic response to temperature as opposed to a response to food or competition. Future studies of life histories and demographics at large spatial scales will need to consider the potentially confounding roles of temperature, resource usage and availability, and abundance/competition to disentangle the effects of these environmental variables. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank D DeVere, J Pitt, and WD Robbins for field assistance. We are also grateful to the staff of Lizard Island and One Tree Island Research Stations for logistic support. Comments from two anonymous reviewers and PL Munday greatly improved the manuscript. This work was supported by a National Science Foundation (USA) Graduate Research Fellowship (MLB) and by PADI Project A. W. A. R. E. (MLB).en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectChaetodontidaeen
dc.subjectCoral coveren
dc.subjectGrowthen
dc.subjectLatitudeen
dc.subjectLife historyen
dc.titleDifferences in demographic traits of four butterflyfish species between two reefs of the Great Barrier Reef separated by 1,200 kmen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentReef Ecology Laben
dc.identifier.journalCoral Reefsen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Natural Sciences, Massey University, Albany Campus, Private Bag 102904, Auckland, New Zealanden
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
kaust.authorLaman Trip, Elizabethen
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