The plant cuticle is required for osmotic stress regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561772
Title:
The plant cuticle is required for osmotic stress regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis
Authors:
Wang, Zhenyu; Xiong, Liming ( 0000-0001-8099-0806 ) ; Li, Wenbo; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Zhu, Jianhua
Abstract:
Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA). One major step in ABA biosynthesis is the carotenoid cleavage catalyzed by a 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the mechanism for osmotic stress activation of ABA biosynthesis, we screened for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants that failed to induce the NCED3 genee xpression in response to osmotic stress treatments. The ced1 (for 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxy genase defective 1) mutant isolated in this study showed markedly reduced expression of NCED3 in response to osmotic stress (polyethylene glycol)treatments compared with the wild type. Other ABA biosynthesis genes are also greatly reduced in ced1 under osmotic stress. ced1 mutant plants are very sensitive to even mild osmotic stress. Map-based cloning revealed unexpectedly thatCED1 encodes a putative a/b hydrolase domain-containing protein and is allelic to the BODYGUARD gene that was recently shown to be essential for cuticle biogenesis. Further studies discovered that other cut in biosynthesis mutants are also impaired in osmotic stress induction of ABA biosynthesis genes and are sensitive to osmotic stress. Our work demonstrates that the cuticle functions not merely as a physical barrier to minimize water loss but also mediates osmotic stress signaling and tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis and signaling. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience Program; Plant Stress Genomics Research Lab
Publisher:
American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB)
Journal:
The Plant Cell
Issue Date:
1-May-2011
DOI:
10.1105/tpc.110.081943
PubMed ID:
21610183
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3123942
Type:
Article
ISSN:
10404651
Sponsors:
We thank Paul E. Verslues for help with the initial phase of the work, Iida Kei for help with analyzing the microarray data, and Rebecca Stevenson for technical assistance. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants R01GM070795 and R01GM059138 to J.-K.Z. and by National Science Foundation Grant IOS0919745 to J.Z.
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3123942
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zhenyuen
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Limingen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wenboen
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jian-Kangen
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jianhuaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:04:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:04:15Zen
dc.date.issued2011-05-01en
dc.identifier.issn10404651en
dc.identifier.pmid21610183en
dc.identifier.doi10.1105/tpc.110.081943en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561772en
dc.description.abstractOsmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA). One major step in ABA biosynthesis is the carotenoid cleavage catalyzed by a 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the mechanism for osmotic stress activation of ABA biosynthesis, we screened for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants that failed to induce the NCED3 genee xpression in response to osmotic stress treatments. The ced1 (for 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxy genase defective 1) mutant isolated in this study showed markedly reduced expression of NCED3 in response to osmotic stress (polyethylene glycol)treatments compared with the wild type. Other ABA biosynthesis genes are also greatly reduced in ced1 under osmotic stress. ced1 mutant plants are very sensitive to even mild osmotic stress. Map-based cloning revealed unexpectedly thatCED1 encodes a putative a/b hydrolase domain-containing protein and is allelic to the BODYGUARD gene that was recently shown to be essential for cuticle biogenesis. Further studies discovered that other cut in biosynthesis mutants are also impaired in osmotic stress induction of ABA biosynthesis genes and are sensitive to osmotic stress. Our work demonstrates that the cuticle functions not merely as a physical barrier to minimize water loss but also mediates osmotic stress signaling and tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis and signaling. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Paul E. Verslues for help with the initial phase of the work, Iida Kei for help with analyzing the microarray data, and Rebecca Stevenson for technical assistance. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants R01GM070795 and R01GM059138 to J.-K.Z. and by National Science Foundation Grant IOS0919745 to J.Z.en
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3123942en
dc.titleThe plant cuticle is required for osmotic stress regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Stress Genomics Research Laben
dc.identifier.journalThe Plant Cellen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3123942en
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory of Arid and Grassland Ecology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu Province, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Integrative Genome, Biology Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, United Statesen
kaust.authorWang, Zhenyuen
kaust.authorXiong, Limingen
kaust.authorZhu, Jian-Kangen

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