Soil aquifer treatment of artificial wastewater under saturated conditions

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561768
Title:
Soil aquifer treatment of artificial wastewater under saturated conditions
Authors:
Essandoh, H. M K; Tizaoui, Chedly; Mohamed, Mostafa H A; Amy, Gary L.; Brdjanovic, Damir
Abstract:
A 2000 mm long saturated laboratory soil column was used to simulate soil aquifer treatment under saturated conditions to assess the removal of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand (COD and BOD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen and phosphate, using high strength artificial wastewater. The removal rates were determined under a combination of constant hydraulic loading rates (HLR) and variable COD concentrations as well as variable HLR under a constant COD. Within the range of COD concentrations considered (42 mg L-1-135 mg L-1) it was found that at fixed hydraulic loading rate, a decrease in the influent concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total nitrogen and phosphate improved their removal efficiencies. At the high COD concentrations applied residence times influenced the redox conditions in the soil column. Long residence times were detrimental to the removal process for COD, BOD and DOC as anoxic processes and sulphate reduction played an important role as electron acceptors. It was found that total COD mass loading within the range of 911 mg d-1-1780 mg d-1 applied as low COD wastewater infiltrated coupled with short residence times would provide better effluent quality than the same mass applied as a COD with higher concentration at long residence times. The opposite was true for organic nitrogen where relatively high concentrations coupled with long residence time gave better removal efficiency. © 2011.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
May-2011
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2011.05.017
PubMed ID:
21700308
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00431354
Sponsors:
The study was carried out with support from The Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher Education (Nuffic).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEssandoh, H. M Ken
dc.contributor.authorTizaoui, Chedlyen
dc.contributor.authorMohamed, Mostafa H Aen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.contributor.authorBrdjanovic, Damiren
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:04:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:04:10Zen
dc.date.issued2011-05en
dc.identifier.issn00431354en
dc.identifier.pmid21700308en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2011.05.017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561768en
dc.description.abstractA 2000 mm long saturated laboratory soil column was used to simulate soil aquifer treatment under saturated conditions to assess the removal of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand (COD and BOD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen and phosphate, using high strength artificial wastewater. The removal rates were determined under a combination of constant hydraulic loading rates (HLR) and variable COD concentrations as well as variable HLR under a constant COD. Within the range of COD concentrations considered (42 mg L-1-135 mg L-1) it was found that at fixed hydraulic loading rate, a decrease in the influent concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total nitrogen and phosphate improved their removal efficiencies. At the high COD concentrations applied residence times influenced the redox conditions in the soil column. Long residence times were detrimental to the removal process for COD, BOD and DOC as anoxic processes and sulphate reduction played an important role as electron acceptors. It was found that total COD mass loading within the range of 911 mg d-1-1780 mg d-1 applied as low COD wastewater infiltrated coupled with short residence times would provide better effluent quality than the same mass applied as a COD with higher concentration at long residence times. The opposite was true for organic nitrogen where relatively high concentrations coupled with long residence time gave better removal efficiency. © 2011.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was carried out with support from The Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher Education (Nuffic).en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectChemical oxygen demanden
dc.subjectHydraulic loading rateen
dc.subjectMass loading rateen
dc.subjectRemoval efficiencyen
dc.subjectSoil aquifer treatmenten
dc.titleSoil aquifer treatment of artificial wastewater under saturated conditionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Engineering Design and Technology, University of Bradford, BD7 1DP, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Engineering, Swansea University, SA2 8PP, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionUNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft, Netherlandsen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en
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