Nanofiltration vs. reverse osmosis for the removal of emerging organic contaminants in water reuse

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561700
Title:
Nanofiltration vs. reverse osmosis for the removal of emerging organic contaminants in water reuse
Authors:
Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Maeng, Sungkyu; Fujioka, Takahiro; Kennedy, Maria Dolores; Li, Zhenyu; Amya, Gary
Abstract:
Reverse osmosis (RO) in existing water reuse facilities is a water industry standard. However, that approach may be questioned taking into consideration that "tight" NF can be equal or "better" than RO. NF can achieve the same removals of RO membranes when dealing with emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors and others). Experiments using 18 emerging contaminants were performed using membranes NF200 and NF90 at bench-scale units, and for a more complete study, results of NF and RO pilot and fullscale experiments where compared to our experimental results. The removal results showed that NF can remove many emerging contaminants. The average removal by tight NF was 82% for neutral contaminants and 97% for ionic contaminants. The average removal by RO was 85% for neutral contaminants and 99% for ionic contaminants. Aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) followed by NF can effectively remove emerging contaminants with removals over 90% when loose NF membranes are used. © 2011 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Desalination and Water Treatment
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2011
DOI:
10/5004/dwt.2011.2860
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19443994
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYangali-Quintanilla, Victoren
dc.contributor.authorMaeng, Sungkyuen
dc.contributor.authorFujioka, Takahiroen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Maria Doloresen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhenyuen
dc.contributor.authorAmya, Garyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:02:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:02:36Zen
dc.date.issued2011-01-01en
dc.identifier.issn19443994en
dc.identifier.doi10/5004/dwt.2011.2860en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561700en
dc.description.abstractReverse osmosis (RO) in existing water reuse facilities is a water industry standard. However, that approach may be questioned taking into consideration that "tight" NF can be equal or "better" than RO. NF can achieve the same removals of RO membranes when dealing with emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors and others). Experiments using 18 emerging contaminants were performed using membranes NF200 and NF90 at bench-scale units, and for a more complete study, results of NF and RO pilot and fullscale experiments where compared to our experimental results. The removal results showed that NF can remove many emerging contaminants. The average removal by tight NF was 82% for neutral contaminants and 97% for ionic contaminants. The average removal by RO was 85% for neutral contaminants and 99% for ionic contaminants. Aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) followed by NF can effectively remove emerging contaminants with removals over 90% when loose NF membranes are used. © 2011 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.en
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.subjectEmerging contaminantsen
dc.subjectNanofiltrationen
dc.subjectReverse osmosisen
dc.subjectWater reuseen
dc.titleNanofiltration vs. reverse osmosis for the removal of emerging organic contaminants in water reuseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalDesalination and Water Treatmenten
dc.contributor.institutionUNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionKorea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650, South Koreaen
kaust.authorYangali-Quintanilla, Victoren
kaust.authorLi, Zhenyuen
kaust.authorAmya, Garyen
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