Diversity of Dominant Bacterial Taxa in Activated Sludge Promotes Functional Resistance following Toxic Shock Loading

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561641
Title:
Diversity of Dominant Bacterial Taxa in Activated Sludge Promotes Functional Resistance following Toxic Shock Loading
Authors:
Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 ) ; Oerther, Daniel B. Barton
Abstract:
Examining the relationship between biodiversity and functional stability (resistance and resilience) of activated sludge bacterial communities following disturbance is an important first step towards developing strategies for the design of robust biological wastewater treatment systems. This study investigates the relationship between functional resistance and biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa by subjecting activated sludge samples, with different levels of biodiversity, to toxic shock loading with cupric sulfate (Cu[II]), 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), or 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Respirometric batch experiments were performed to determine the functional resistance of activated sludge bacterial community to the three toxicants. Functional resistance was estimated as the 30 min IC50 or the concentration of toxicant that results in a 50% reduction in oxygen utilization rate compared to a referential state represented by a control receiving no toxicant. Biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-T-RFLP) targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Statistical analysis of 30 min IC50 values and PCR-T-RFLP data showed a significant positive correlation (P<0.05) between functional resistance and microbial diversity for each of the three toxicants tested. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a positive correlation between biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa in activated sludge and functional resistance. In this system, activated sludge bacterial communities with higher biodiversity are functionally more resistant to disturbance caused by toxic shock loading. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Environmental Biotechnology Research Group
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Microbial Ecology
Issue Date:
14-Dec-2010
DOI:
10.1007/s00248-010-9783-6
PubMed ID:
21153808
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00953628
Sponsors:
The authors thank Brian Kinkle, Bruce Rittmann, Makram Suidan, and Jim Young for useful discussion. Financial support from the National Science Foundation to Daniel B. Oerther (BES 0238858) is gratefully acknowledged.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorOerther, Daniel B. Bartonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-03T09:01:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-03T09:01:08Zen
dc.date.issued2010-12-14en
dc.identifier.issn00953628en
dc.identifier.pmid21153808en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-010-9783-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561641en
dc.description.abstractExamining the relationship between biodiversity and functional stability (resistance and resilience) of activated sludge bacterial communities following disturbance is an important first step towards developing strategies for the design of robust biological wastewater treatment systems. This study investigates the relationship between functional resistance and biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa by subjecting activated sludge samples, with different levels of biodiversity, to toxic shock loading with cupric sulfate (Cu[II]), 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), or 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Respirometric batch experiments were performed to determine the functional resistance of activated sludge bacterial community to the three toxicants. Functional resistance was estimated as the 30 min IC50 or the concentration of toxicant that results in a 50% reduction in oxygen utilization rate compared to a referential state represented by a control receiving no toxicant. Biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-T-RFLP) targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Statistical analysis of 30 min IC50 values and PCR-T-RFLP data showed a significant positive correlation (P<0.05) between functional resistance and microbial diversity for each of the three toxicants tested. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a positive correlation between biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa in activated sludge and functional resistance. In this system, activated sludge bacterial communities with higher biodiversity are functionally more resistant to disturbance caused by toxic shock loading. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank Brian Kinkle, Bruce Rittmann, Makram Suidan, and Jim Young for useful discussion. Financial support from the National Science Foundation to Daniel B. Oerther (BES 0238858) is gratefully acknowledged.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.titleDiversity of Dominant Bacterial Taxa in Activated Sludge Promotes Functional Resistance following Toxic Shock Loadingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Biotechnology Research Groupen
dc.identifier.journalMicrobial Ecologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanonen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental Research Center, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409, United Statesen
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
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