Subsurface iron and arsenic removal: Low-cost technology for community-based water supply in Bangladesh

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561605
Title:
Subsurface iron and arsenic removal: Low-cost technology for community-based water supply in Bangladesh
Authors:
Van Halem, Doris; Heijman, Bas G J; Johnston, Richard Bart; Huq, Imamul M.; Ghosh, Sanchari K.; Verberk, Jasper Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.
Abstract:
The principle of subsurface or in situ iron and arsenic removal is that aerated water is periodically injected into an anoxic aquifer through a tube well, displacing groundwater containing Fe(II). An oxidation zone is created around the tube well where Fe(II) is oxidised. The freshly formed iron hydroxide surfaces provide new sorption sites for soluble Fe(II) andarsenic. The system's efficiency is determined based on the ratio between abstracted volume with reduced iron/arsenic concentrations (V) and the injected volume (Vi). In the field studypresented in this paper, the small-scale application of this technology was investigated in rural Bangladesh. It was found that at small injection volumes (>1m3) iron removal was successful and became more effective with every successive cycle. For arsenic, however, the system did not prove to be very effective yet. Arsenic retardation was only limited and breakthrough of 10mg/L (WHO guideline) was observed before V/Vi = 1, which corresponds to arrival of groundwater at the well. Possible explanations for insufficient arsenic adsorption are the short contact times within the oxidation zone, and the presence of competing anions, like phosphate. © IWA Publishing 2010.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
IWA Publishing
Journal:
Water Science & Technology
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
DOI:
10.2166/wst.2010.463
PubMed ID:
21099059
Type:
Article
ISSN:
02731223
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVan Halem, Dorisen
dc.contributor.authorHeijman, Bas G Jen
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Richard Barten
dc.contributor.authorHuq, Imamul M.en
dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Sanchari K.en
dc.contributor.authorVerberk, Jasper Q J Cen
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Dijk, Johannis C.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:15:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:15:12Zen
dc.date.issued2010-12en
dc.identifier.issn02731223en
dc.identifier.pmid21099059en
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/wst.2010.463en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561605en
dc.description.abstractThe principle of subsurface or in situ iron and arsenic removal is that aerated water is periodically injected into an anoxic aquifer through a tube well, displacing groundwater containing Fe(II). An oxidation zone is created around the tube well where Fe(II) is oxidised. The freshly formed iron hydroxide surfaces provide new sorption sites for soluble Fe(II) andarsenic. The system's efficiency is determined based on the ratio between abstracted volume with reduced iron/arsenic concentrations (V) and the injected volume (Vi). In the field studypresented in this paper, the small-scale application of this technology was investigated in rural Bangladesh. It was found that at small injection volumes (>1m3) iron removal was successful and became more effective with every successive cycle. For arsenic, however, the system did not prove to be very effective yet. Arsenic retardation was only limited and breakthrough of 10mg/L (WHO guideline) was observed before V/Vi = 1, which corresponds to arrival of groundwater at the well. Possible explanations for insufficient arsenic adsorption are the short contact times within the oxidation zone, and the presence of competing anions, like phosphate. © IWA Publishing 2010.en
dc.publisherIWA Publishingen
dc.subjectArsenicen
dc.subjectBangladeshen
dc.subjectCommunity-baseden
dc.subjectDrinking wateren
dc.subjectIronen
dc.subjectSubsurfaceen
dc.titleSubsurface iron and arsenic removal: Low-cost technology for community-based water supply in Bangladeshen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalWater Science & Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionUNESCO-IHE, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Public Health Engineering, Bangladeshen
kaust.authorAmy, Gary L.en

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