Transport behavior of surrogate biological warfare agents in a simulated landfill: Effect of leachate recirculation and water infiltration

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561570
Title:
Transport behavior of surrogate biological warfare agents in a simulated landfill: Effect of leachate recirculation and water infiltration
Authors:
Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 ) ; Hicks, Kristin A.; Barlaz, Morton A.; De Los Reyes, Francis Delos De Los
Abstract:
An understanding of the transport behavior of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills is required to evaluate the suitability of landfills for the disposal of building decontamination residue (BDR) following a bioterrorist attack on a building. Surrogate BW agents, Bacillus atrophaeus spores and Serratia marcescens, were spiked into simulated landfill reactors that were filled with synthetic building debris (SBD) and operated for 4 months with leachate recirculation or water infiltration. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to monitor surrogate transport. In the leachate recirculation reactors, <10% of spiked surrogates were eluted in leachate over 4 months. In contrast, 45% and 31% of spiked S. marcescens and B. atrophaeus spores were eluted in leachate in the water infiltration reactors. At the termination of the experiment, the number of retained cells and spores in SBD was measured over the depth of the reactor. Less than 3% of the total spiked S. marcescens cells and no B. atrophaeus spores were detected in SBD. These results suggest that significant fractions of the spiked surrogates were strongly attached to SBD. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Environmental Biotechnology Research Group
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Environmental Science & Technology
Issue Date:
15-Nov-2010
DOI:
10.1021/es101937a
PubMed ID:
20973546
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0013936X
Sponsors:
This research was supported by the US EPA through the National Homeland Security Research Center, Susan Thorneloe, Senior Project Officer. The input of Susan Thorneloe and Paul Lemieux of the US EPA is gratefully acknowledged. This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the EPA. We thank Rossana Prevost for help with assessing DNA extraction from SBD.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Kristin A.en
dc.contributor.authorBarlaz, Morton A.en
dc.contributor.authorDe Los Reyes, Francis Delos De Losen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:14:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:14:27Zen
dc.date.issued2010-11-15en
dc.identifier.issn0013936Xen
dc.identifier.pmid20973546en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es101937aen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561570en
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of the transport behavior of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills is required to evaluate the suitability of landfills for the disposal of building decontamination residue (BDR) following a bioterrorist attack on a building. Surrogate BW agents, Bacillus atrophaeus spores and Serratia marcescens, were spiked into simulated landfill reactors that were filled with synthetic building debris (SBD) and operated for 4 months with leachate recirculation or water infiltration. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to monitor surrogate transport. In the leachate recirculation reactors, <10% of spiked surrogates were eluted in leachate over 4 months. In contrast, 45% and 31% of spiked S. marcescens and B. atrophaeus spores were eluted in leachate in the water infiltration reactors. At the termination of the experiment, the number of retained cells and spores in SBD was measured over the depth of the reactor. Less than 3% of the total spiked S. marcescens cells and no B. atrophaeus spores were detected in SBD. These results suggest that significant fractions of the spiked surrogates were strongly attached to SBD. © 2010 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the US EPA through the National Homeland Security Research Center, Susan Thorneloe, Senior Project Officer. The input of Susan Thorneloe and Paul Lemieux of the US EPA is gratefully acknowledged. This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the EPA. We thank Rossana Prevost for help with assessing DNA extraction from SBD.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleTransport behavior of surrogate biological warfare agents in a simulated landfill: Effect of leachate recirculation and water infiltrationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Biotechnology Research Groupen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science & Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut, Lebanonen
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
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