Genetic analysis of pathway regulation for enhancing branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561514
Title:
Genetic analysis of pathway regulation for enhancing branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants
Authors:
Chen, Hao; Saksa, Kristen; Zhao, Feiyi; Qiu, Joyce; Xiong, Liming ( 0000-0001-8099-0806 )
Abstract:
The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine are essential amino acids that play critical roles in animal growth and development. Animals cannot synthesize these amino acids and must obtain them from their diet. Plants are the ultimate source of these essential nutrients, and they synthesize BCAAs through a conserved pathway that is inhibited by its end products. This feedback inhibition has prevented scientists from engineering plants that accumulate high levels of BCAAs by simply over-expressing the respective biosynthetic genes. To identify components critical for this feedback regulation, we performed a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit enhanced resistance to BCAAs. Multiple dominant allelic mutations in the VALINE-TOLERANT 1 (VAT1) gene were identified that conferred plant resistance to valine inhibition. Map-based cloning revealed that VAT1 encodes a regulatory subunit of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS), the first committed enzyme in the BCAA biosynthesis pathway. The VAT1 gene is highly expressed in young, rapidly growing tissues. When reconstituted with the catalytic subunit in vitro, the vat1 mutant-containing AHAS holoenzyme exhibits increased resistance to valine. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the mutated vat1 gene exhibit valine tolerance and accumulate higher levels of BCAAs. Our studies not only uncovered regulatory characteristics of plant AHAS, but also identified a method to enhance BCAA accumulation in crop plants that will significantly enhance the nutritional value of food and feed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Center for Desert Agriculture; Bioscience Program; Plant Stress Genomics Research Lab
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
The Plant Journal
Issue Date:
Aug-2010
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04261.x
PubMed ID:
20497381
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09607412
Sponsors:
We thank Drs Leslie Hicks and Sophie Alvarez at the Danforth Plant Science Center for helping with amino acid quantification, and Dr Jian-Kang Zhu for critical reading of the manuscript. K. S. was supported by a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates internship (grant number 0521250 to L. X). This study was supported by United States Department of Agriculture National Research Initiative competitive grant number 2004-02111 and the Monsanto Company (to L. X.).
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Bioscience Program; Center for Desert Agriculture; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChen, Haoen
dc.contributor.authorSaksa, Kristenen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Feiyien
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Joyceen
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Limingen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:13:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:13:13Zen
dc.date.issued2010-08en
dc.identifier.issn09607412en
dc.identifier.pmid20497381en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04261.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561514en
dc.description.abstractThe branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine are essential amino acids that play critical roles in animal growth and development. Animals cannot synthesize these amino acids and must obtain them from their diet. Plants are the ultimate source of these essential nutrients, and they synthesize BCAAs through a conserved pathway that is inhibited by its end products. This feedback inhibition has prevented scientists from engineering plants that accumulate high levels of BCAAs by simply over-expressing the respective biosynthetic genes. To identify components critical for this feedback regulation, we performed a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit enhanced resistance to BCAAs. Multiple dominant allelic mutations in the VALINE-TOLERANT 1 (VAT1) gene were identified that conferred plant resistance to valine inhibition. Map-based cloning revealed that VAT1 encodes a regulatory subunit of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS), the first committed enzyme in the BCAA biosynthesis pathway. The VAT1 gene is highly expressed in young, rapidly growing tissues. When reconstituted with the catalytic subunit in vitro, the vat1 mutant-containing AHAS holoenzyme exhibits increased resistance to valine. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the mutated vat1 gene exhibit valine tolerance and accumulate higher levels of BCAAs. Our studies not only uncovered regulatory characteristics of plant AHAS, but also identified a method to enhance BCAA accumulation in crop plants that will significantly enhance the nutritional value of food and feed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Drs Leslie Hicks and Sophie Alvarez at the Danforth Plant Science Center for helping with amino acid quantification, and Dr Jian-Kang Zhu for critical reading of the manuscript. K. S. was supported by a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates internship (grant number 0521250 to L. X). This study was supported by United States Department of Agriculture National Research Initiative competitive grant number 2004-02111 and the Monsanto Company (to L. X.).en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectACT domainen
dc.subjectAHASen
dc.subjectBCAAen
dc.subjectbranched-chain amino acidsen
dc.subjectessential amino acidsen
dc.subjectvaline resistanceen
dc.titleGenetic analysis of pathway regulation for enhancing branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plantsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Stress Genomics Research Laben
dc.identifier.journalThe Plant Journalen
dc.contributor.institutionDonald Danforth Plant Science Center, St Louis, MO 63132, United Statesen
kaust.authorXiong, Limingen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.