Trophic structure and community stability in an overfished ecosystem

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561493
Title:
Trophic structure and community stability in an overfished ecosystem
Authors:
Utne-Palm, Anne Christine; Salvanes, Anne Gro Vea; Currie, Bronwen; Kaartvedt, Stein ( 0000-0002-8793-2948 ) ; Nilsson, Göran E.; Braithwaite, Victoria A.; Stecyk, Jonathan A W; Hundt, Matthias; Van Der Bank, Megan G.; Flynn, Bradley A.; Sandvik, Guro Katrine; Klevjer, Thor Aleksander; Sweetman, Andrew K.; Brüchert, Volker; Pittman, Karin A.; Peard, Kathleen R.; Lunde, Ida Gjervold; Strandaba, R. A U; Gibbons, Mark J.
Abstract:
Since the collapse of the pelagic fisheries off southwest Africa in the late 1960s, jellyfish biomass has increased and the structure of the Benguelan fish community has shifted, making the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) the new predominant prey species. Despite increased prédation pressure and a harsh environment, the gobies are thriving. Here we show that physiological adaptations and antipredator and foraging behaviors underpin the success of these fish. In particular, body-tissue isotope signatures reveal that gobies consume jellyfish and sulphidic diatomaceous mud, transferring "dead-end" resources back into the food chain.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Publisher:
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Journal:
Science
Issue Date:
15-Jul-2010
DOI:
10.1126/science.1190708
PubMed ID:
20647468
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00368075
Sponsors:
We thank the crew of the G. O. Sars; F. Midtoy for assistance; and P. Ellitson, M. Hordnes, R. Jones, R. Amundsen and the rest of the scientific crew. We thank the National Research Foundation of South Africa, the Research Council of Norway, and our home institutions for funding and support. We thank BENEFIT (Benguela Environment Fisheries Interaction and Training), S. Sundby, D. C. Boyer, J. Otto Krakstad, and the crew of the research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen for support with earlier goby cruises, laying the basis for the present study. We thank K. Helge Jensen for statistical support. We appreciate the comments on this manuscript by J. Giske, C. Jorgensen, M. P. Heino, and the anonymous reviewers. Care and handling of experimental animals were performed in accordance with institutional guidelines. J. A. W. S. was a postdoctoral researcher funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Reserach Council of Canada at the time when the research was conducted.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUtne-Palm, Anne Christineen
dc.contributor.authorSalvanes, Anne Gro Veaen
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Bronwenen
dc.contributor.authorKaartvedt, Steinen
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Göran E.en
dc.contributor.authorBraithwaite, Victoria A.en
dc.contributor.authorStecyk, Jonathan A Wen
dc.contributor.authorHundt, Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Bank, Megan G.en
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Bradley A.en
dc.contributor.authorSandvik, Guro Katrineen
dc.contributor.authorKlevjer, Thor Aleksanderen
dc.contributor.authorSweetman, Andrew K.en
dc.contributor.authorBrüchert, Volkeren
dc.contributor.authorPittman, Karin A.en
dc.contributor.authorPeard, Kathleen R.en
dc.contributor.authorLunde, Ida Gjervolden
dc.contributor.authorStrandaba, R. A Uen
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Mark J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:12:43Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:12:43Zen
dc.date.issued2010-07-15en
dc.identifier.issn00368075en
dc.identifier.pmid20647468en
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.1190708en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561493en
dc.description.abstractSince the collapse of the pelagic fisheries off southwest Africa in the late 1960s, jellyfish biomass has increased and the structure of the Benguelan fish community has shifted, making the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) the new predominant prey species. Despite increased prédation pressure and a harsh environment, the gobies are thriving. Here we show that physiological adaptations and antipredator and foraging behaviors underpin the success of these fish. In particular, body-tissue isotope signatures reveal that gobies consume jellyfish and sulphidic diatomaceous mud, transferring "dead-end" resources back into the food chain.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the crew of the G. O. Sars; F. Midtoy for assistance; and P. Ellitson, M. Hordnes, R. Jones, R. Amundsen and the rest of the scientific crew. We thank the National Research Foundation of South Africa, the Research Council of Norway, and our home institutions for funding and support. We thank BENEFIT (Benguela Environment Fisheries Interaction and Training), S. Sundby, D. C. Boyer, J. Otto Krakstad, and the crew of the research vessel Dr. Fridtjof Nansen for support with earlier goby cruises, laying the basis for the present study. We thank K. Helge Jensen for statistical support. We appreciate the comments on this manuscript by J. Giske, C. Jorgensen, M. P. Heino, and the anonymous reviewers. Care and handling of experimental animals were performed in accordance with institutional guidelines. J. A. W. S. was a postdoctoral researcher funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Reserach Council of Canada at the time when the research was conducted.en
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)en
dc.titleTrophic structure and community stability in an overfished ecosystemen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalScienceen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Marine Information, Research Centre, Swakopmund, Namibiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Molecular Biosdences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Forest Resources, Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMinistry of Fisheries, Marine Resources, Lüderitz, Namibiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biodiversity and Conservation Biology, University of the Western Cape, BeLMLLe, South Africaen
dc.contributor.institutionNorwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Regional Office Bergen, Bergen, Norwayen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sdences, Stakholm University, Stockholm, Swedenen
kaust.authorKaartvedt, Steinen

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