A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561487
Title:
A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis
Authors:
Zhu, Jianhua; Lee, Byeongha; Dellinger, Michael T.; Cui, Xinping; Zhang, Changqing; Wu, Shang; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Zhu, Jian-Kang
Abstract:
Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Center for Desert Agriculture
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Plant Journal
Issue Date:
16-Apr-2010
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04227.x
PubMed ID:
20409003
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3061338
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09607412
Sponsors:
We thank Xianwu Zheng, Chun-Hai Dong, Becky Stevenson and Woody Smith for excellent technical assistance. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R01GM059138 to J.-K. Zhu and by National Science Foundation Grant IOS0919745 to J. Zhu and by Sogang University Research Grant (200810022) and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of the Korean Government (2009-0089383) to B.-H. Lee.
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3061338
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jianhuaen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Byeonghaen
dc.contributor.authorDellinger, Michael T.en
dc.contributor.authorCui, Xinpingen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Changqingen
dc.contributor.authorWu, Shangen
dc.contributor.authorNothnagel, Eugene A.en
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jian-Kangen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:12:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:12:35Zen
dc.date.issued2010-04-16en
dc.identifier.issn09607412en
dc.identifier.pmid20409003en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04227.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561487en
dc.description.abstractOsmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Xianwu Zheng, Chun-Hai Dong, Becky Stevenson and Woody Smith for excellent technical assistance. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R01GM059138 to J.-K. Zhu and by National Science Foundation Grant IOS0919745 to J. Zhu and by Sogang University Research Grant (200810022) and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of the Korean Government (2009-0089383) to B.-H. Lee.en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3061338en
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectcell wallen
dc.subjectcellulose synthase-like proteinen
dc.subjectosmotic stress toleranceen
dc.subjectreactive oxygen speciesen
dc.subjectSOS6en
dc.titleA cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalPlant Journalen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3061338en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Life Science, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742, South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Statistics, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Texas Southwestern, Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSection of Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Natural Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, United Statesen
kaust.authorZhu, Jian-Kangen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.