Green chemistry by nano-catalysis

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561471
Title:
Green chemistry by nano-catalysis
Authors:
Polshettiwar, Vivek ( 0000-0003-1375-9668 ) ; Varma, Rajender S.
Abstract:
Nano-materials are important in many diverse areas, from basic research to various applications in electronics, biochemical sensors, catalysis and energy. They have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust high surface area heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports. The nano-sized particles increase the exposed surface area of the active component of the catalyst, thereby enhancing the contact between reactants and catalyst dramatically and mimicking the homogeneous catalysts. This review focuses on the use of nano-catalysis for green chemistry development including the strategy of using microwave heating with nano-catalysis in benign aqueous reaction media which offers an extraordinary synergistic effect with greater potential than these three components in isolation. To illustrate the proof-of-concept of this "green and sustainable" approach, representative examples are discussed in this article. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
KAUST Department:
KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC); Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Journal:
Green Chemistry
Issue Date:
2010
DOI:
10.1039/b921171c
Type:
Article
ISSN:
14639262
Sponsors:
Authors thank their associates, especially Dr.'s M. N. Nadagouda and B. Baruwati, among others, for their valuable contributions to our research program on Green Nano-materials. VP was supported, in part, by the Postgraduate Research Program at the National Risk Management Research Laboratory administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education through an interagency agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. EPA.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPolshettiwar, Viveken
dc.contributor.authorVarma, Rajender S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:12:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:12:13Zen
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.issn14639262en
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/b921171cen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561471en
dc.description.abstractNano-materials are important in many diverse areas, from basic research to various applications in electronics, biochemical sensors, catalysis and energy. They have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust high surface area heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports. The nano-sized particles increase the exposed surface area of the active component of the catalyst, thereby enhancing the contact between reactants and catalyst dramatically and mimicking the homogeneous catalysts. This review focuses on the use of nano-catalysis for green chemistry development including the strategy of using microwave heating with nano-catalysis in benign aqueous reaction media which offers an extraordinary synergistic effect with greater potential than these three components in isolation. To illustrate the proof-of-concept of this "green and sustainable" approach, representative examples are discussed in this article. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAuthors thank their associates, especially Dr.'s M. N. Nadagouda and B. Baruwati, among others, for their valuable contributions to our research program on Green Nano-materials. VP was supported, in part, by the Postgraduate Research Program at the National Risk Management Research Laboratory administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education through an interagency agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. EPA.en
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistryen
dc.titleGreen chemistry by nano-catalysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Catalysis Center (KCC)en
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalGreen Chemistryen
dc.contributor.institutionSustainable Technology Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45268, United Statesen
kaust.authorPolshettiwar, Viveken
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