External tagging does not affect the feeding behavior of a coral reef fish, Chaetodon vagabundus (Pisces: Chaetodontidae)

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/561459
Title:
External tagging does not affect the feeding behavior of a coral reef fish, Chaetodon vagabundus (Pisces: Chaetodontidae)
Authors:
Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 ) ; Almany, Glenn R.
Abstract:
Increasingly, the ability to recognize individual fishes is important for studies of population dynamics, ecology, and behavior. Although a variety of methods exist, external tags remain one of the most widely applied because they are both effective and cost efficient. However, a key assumption is that neither the tagging procedure nor the presence of a tag negatively affects the individual. While this has been demonstrated for relatively coarse metrics such as growth and survival, few studies have examined the impact of tags and tagging on more subtle aspects of behavior. We tagged adult vagabond butterflyfish (Chaetodon vagabundus) occupying a 30-ha insular reef in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, using a commonly-utilized t-bar anchor tag. We quantified and compared feeding behavior (bite rate), which is sensitive to stress, of tagged and untagged individuals over four separate sampling periods spanning 4 months post-tagging. Bite rates did not differ between tagged and untagged individuals at each sampling period and, combined with additional anecdotal observations of normal pairing behavior and successful reproduction, suggest that tagging did not adversely affect individuals. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Marine Science Program; Reef Ecology Lab
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Issue Date:
10-Nov-2009
DOI:
10.1007/s10641-009-9545-9
Type:
Article
ISSN:
03781909
Sponsors:
Invaluable logistic support for this project was provided by the crew of the M/V FeBrina and the M/V Warrior as well as the staff of theMahonia NaDari research station in Kimbe, Papua New Guinea. For field assistance, we thank J Almany, D deVere and C Syms. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Fulbright Program, National Science Foundation and the Australian Research Council. Comments from MS Pratchett and two anonymous reviewers greatly improved the manuscript.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Marine Science Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorAlmany, Glenn R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-02T09:11:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-02T09:11:55Zen
dc.date.issued2009-11-10en
dc.identifier.issn03781909en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10641-009-9545-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/561459en
dc.description.abstractIncreasingly, the ability to recognize individual fishes is important for studies of population dynamics, ecology, and behavior. Although a variety of methods exist, external tags remain one of the most widely applied because they are both effective and cost efficient. However, a key assumption is that neither the tagging procedure nor the presence of a tag negatively affects the individual. While this has been demonstrated for relatively coarse metrics such as growth and survival, few studies have examined the impact of tags and tagging on more subtle aspects of behavior. We tagged adult vagabond butterflyfish (Chaetodon vagabundus) occupying a 30-ha insular reef in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, using a commonly-utilized t-bar anchor tag. We quantified and compared feeding behavior (bite rate), which is sensitive to stress, of tagged and untagged individuals over four separate sampling periods spanning 4 months post-tagging. Bite rates did not differ between tagged and untagged individuals at each sampling period and, combined with additional anecdotal observations of normal pairing behavior and successful reproduction, suggest that tagging did not adversely affect individuals. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInvaluable logistic support for this project was provided by the crew of the M/V FeBrina and the M/V Warrior as well as the staff of theMahonia NaDari research station in Kimbe, Papua New Guinea. For field assistance, we thank J Almany, D deVere and C Syms. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Fulbright Program, National Science Foundation and the Australian Research Council. Comments from MS Pratchett and two anonymous reviewers greatly improved the manuscript.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectFeeding behavioren
dc.subjectPapua New Guineaen
dc.subjectT-bar anchor tagsen
dc.titleExternal tagging does not affect the feeding behavior of a coral reef fish, Chaetodon vagabundus (Pisces: Chaetodontidae)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Programen
dc.contributor.departmentReef Ecology Laben
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Biology of Fishesen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, MS #50, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australiaen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
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