Resistance to Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus (SLCMV) in Genetically Engineered Cassava cv. KU50 through RNA Silencing

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/558487
Title:
Resistance to Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus (SLCMV) in Genetically Engineered Cassava cv. KU50 through RNA Silencing
Authors:
Ntui, Valentine Otang; Kong, Kynet; Khan, Raham Sher; Igawa, Tomoko; Janavi, Gnanaguru Janaky; Rabindran, Ramalingam; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro
Abstract:
Cassava ranks fifth among the starch producing crops of the world, its annual bioethanol yield is higher than for any other crop. Cassava cultivar KU50, the most widely grown cultivar for non-food purposes is susceptible to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The objective of this work was to engineer resistance to SLCMV by RNA interference (RNAi) in order to increase biomass yield, an important aspect for bioethanol production. Here, we produced transgenic KU50 lines expressing dsRNA homologous to the region between the AV2 and AV1 of DNA A of SLCMV. High level expression of dsRNA of SLCMV did not induce any growth abnormality in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines displayed high levels of resistance to SLCMV compared to the wild-type plants and no virus load could be detected in uninoculated new leaves of the infected resistant lines after PCR amplification and RT-PCR analysis. The agronomic performance of the transgenic lines was unimpaired after inoculation with the virus as the plants presented similar growth when compared to the mock inoculated control plants and revealed no apparent reduction in the amount and weight of tubers produced. We show that the resistance is correlated with post-transcriptional gene silencing because of the production of transgene specific siRNA. The results demonstrate that transgenic lines exhibited high levels of resistance to SLCMV. This resistance coupled with the desirable yield components in the transgenic lines makes them better candidates for exploitation in the production of biomass as well as bioethanol.
KAUST Department:
Center for Desert Agriculture
Citation:
Resistance to Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus (SLCMV) in Genetically Engineered Cassava cv. KU50 through RNA Silencing 2015, 10 (4):e0120551 PLOS ONE
Publisher:
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
22-Apr-2015
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0120551
PubMed ID:
25901740
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4406713
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120551
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Center for Desert Agriculture

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNtui, Valentine Otangen
dc.contributor.authorKong, Kyneten
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Raham Sheren
dc.contributor.authorIgawa, Tomokoen
dc.contributor.authorJanavi, Gnanaguru Janakyen
dc.contributor.authorRabindran, Ramalingamen
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Ikuoen
dc.contributor.authorMii, Masahiroen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-24T14:21:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-24T14:21:02Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-22en
dc.identifier.citationResistance to Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus (SLCMV) in Genetically Engineered Cassava cv. KU50 through RNA Silencing 2015, 10 (4):e0120551 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.pmid25901740en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0120551en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/558487en
dc.description.abstractCassava ranks fifth among the starch producing crops of the world, its annual bioethanol yield is higher than for any other crop. Cassava cultivar KU50, the most widely grown cultivar for non-food purposes is susceptible to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The objective of this work was to engineer resistance to SLCMV by RNA interference (RNAi) in order to increase biomass yield, an important aspect for bioethanol production. Here, we produced transgenic KU50 lines expressing dsRNA homologous to the region between the AV2 and AV1 of DNA A of SLCMV. High level expression of dsRNA of SLCMV did not induce any growth abnormality in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines displayed high levels of resistance to SLCMV compared to the wild-type plants and no virus load could be detected in uninoculated new leaves of the infected resistant lines after PCR amplification and RT-PCR analysis. The agronomic performance of the transgenic lines was unimpaired after inoculation with the virus as the plants presented similar growth when compared to the mock inoculated control plants and revealed no apparent reduction in the amount and weight of tubers produced. We show that the resistance is correlated with post-transcriptional gene silencing because of the production of transgene specific siRNA. The results demonstrate that transgenic lines exhibited high levels of resistance to SLCMV. This resistance coupled with the desirable yield components in the transgenic lines makes them better candidates for exploitation in the production of biomass as well as bioethanol.en
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120551en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleResistance to Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus (SLCMV) in Genetically Engineered Cassava cv. KU50 through RNA Silencingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agricultureen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4406713en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Plant Cell Technology, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Chiba, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Genetics/Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeriaen
dc.contributor.institutionCambodia Agricultural Research and Development Institute, Phnom Penh, Cambodiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, Pakistanen
dc.contributor.institutionHorticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, Indiaen
kaust.authorNtui, Valentine Otangen
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