Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/556186
Title:
Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?
Authors:
Regnery, J.; Wing, A.D.; Alidina, M.; Drewes, J.E.
Abstract:
This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e. redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e. less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants? 2015 Journal of Contaminant Hydrology
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology
Issue Date:
29-May-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.jconhyd.2015.05.008
Type:
Article
ISSN:
01697722
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169772215000777
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRegnery, J.en
dc.contributor.authorWing, A.D.en
dc.contributor.authorAlidina, M.en
dc.contributor.authorDrewes, J.E.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-03T08:35:05Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-03T08:35:05Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-29en
dc.identifier.citationBiotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants? 2015 Journal of Contaminant Hydrologyen
dc.identifier.issn01697722en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jconhyd.2015.05.008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/556186en
dc.description.abstractThis study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e. redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e. less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169772215000777en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Contaminant Hydrology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, 29 May 2015. DOI: 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2015.05.008en
dc.subjectTrace organic chemicalsen
dc.subjectmanaged aquifer rechargeen
dc.subjectfirst-order rate constantsen
dc.subjectredox conditionsen
dc.subjectprimary substrateen
dc.subjectattenuation modelingen
dc.titleBiotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Contaminant Hydrologyen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, NSF Engineering Research Center ReNUWIt, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionChair of Urban Water Systems Engineering, Technische Universität München, Garching/München, Germanyen
kaust.authorAlidina, Mazahiralien
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