High Electron Mobility Thin-Film Transistors Based on Solution-Processed Semiconducting Metal Oxide Heterojunctions and Quasi-Superlattices

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/555958
Title:
High Electron Mobility Thin-Film Transistors Based on Solution-Processed Semiconducting Metal Oxide Heterojunctions and Quasi-Superlattices
Authors:
Lin, Yen-Hung; Faber, Hendrik; Labram, John G.; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Sygellou, Labrini; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Hastas, Nikolaos A.; Li, Ruipeng; Zhao, Kui ( 0000-0001-9348-7943 ) ; Amassian, Aram ( 0000-0002-5734-1194 ) ; Treat, Neil D.; McLachlan, Martyn; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.
Abstract:
High mobility thin-film transistor technologies that can be implemented using simple and inexpensive fabrication methods are in great demand because of their applicability in a wide range of emerging optoelectronics. Here, a novel concept of thin-film transistors is reported that exploits the enhanced electron transport properties of low-dimensional polycrystalline heterojunctions and quasi-superlattices (QSLs) consisting of alternating layers of In2O3, Ga2O3, and ZnO grown by sequential spin casting of different precursors in air at low temperatures (180–200 °C). Optimized prototype QSL transistors exhibit band-like transport with electron mobilities approximately a tenfold greater (25–45 cm2 V−1 s−1) than single oxide devices (typically 2–5 cm2 V−1 s−1). Based on temperature-dependent electron transport and capacitance-voltage measurements, it is argued that the enhanced performance arises from the presence of quasi 2D electron gas-like systems formed at the carefully engineered oxide heterointerfaces. The QSL transistor concept proposed here can in principle extend to a range of other oxide material systems and deposition methods (sputtering, atomic layer deposition, spray pyrolysis, roll-to-roll, etc.) and can be seen as an extremely promising technology for application in next-generation large area optoelectronics such as ultrahigh definition optical displays and large-area microelectronics where high performance is a key requirement.
KAUST Department:
Materials Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
High Electron Mobility Thin-Film Transistors Based on Solution-Processed Semiconducting Metal Oxide Heterojunctions and Quasi-Superlattices 2015:n/a Advanced Science
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Advanced Science
Issue Date:
26-May-2015
DOI:
10.1002/advs.201500058
Type:
Article
ISSN:
21983844
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/advs.201500058
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Materials Science and Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLin, Yen-Hungen
dc.contributor.authorFaber, Hendriken
dc.contributor.authorLabram, John G.en
dc.contributor.authorStratakis, Emmanuelen
dc.contributor.authorSygellou, Labrinien
dc.contributor.authorKymakis, Emmanuelen
dc.contributor.authorHastas, Nikolaos A.en
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ruipengen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Kuien
dc.contributor.authorAmassian, Aramen
dc.contributor.authorTreat, Neil D.en
dc.contributor.authorMcLachlan, Martynen
dc.contributor.authorAnthopoulos, Thomas D.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-28T06:00:33Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-28T06:00:33Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-26en
dc.identifier.citationHigh Electron Mobility Thin-Film Transistors Based on Solution-Processed Semiconducting Metal Oxide Heterojunctions and Quasi-Superlattices 2015:n/a Advanced Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn21983844en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/advs.201500058en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/555958en
dc.description.abstractHigh mobility thin-film transistor technologies that can be implemented using simple and inexpensive fabrication methods are in great demand because of their applicability in a wide range of emerging optoelectronics. Here, a novel concept of thin-film transistors is reported that exploits the enhanced electron transport properties of low-dimensional polycrystalline heterojunctions and quasi-superlattices (QSLs) consisting of alternating layers of In2O3, Ga2O3, and ZnO grown by sequential spin casting of different precursors in air at low temperatures (180–200 °C). Optimized prototype QSL transistors exhibit band-like transport with electron mobilities approximately a tenfold greater (25–45 cm2 V−1 s−1) than single oxide devices (typically 2–5 cm2 V−1 s−1). Based on temperature-dependent electron transport and capacitance-voltage measurements, it is argued that the enhanced performance arises from the presence of quasi 2D electron gas-like systems formed at the carefully engineered oxide heterointerfaces. The QSL transistor concept proposed here can in principle extend to a range of other oxide material systems and deposition methods (sputtering, atomic layer deposition, spray pyrolysis, roll-to-roll, etc.) and can be seen as an extremely promising technology for application in next-generation large area optoelectronics such as ultrahigh definition optical displays and large-area microelectronics where high performance is a key requirement.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/advs.201500058en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectenergy quantizationen
dc.subjectmetal oxidesen
dc.subjectsolution-processed materialsen
dc.subjectsuperlatticesen
dc.subjecttransistorsen
dc.subjecttransparent electronicsen
dc.titleHigh Electron Mobility Thin-Film Transistors Based on Solution-Processed Semiconducting Metal Oxide Heterojunctions and Quasi-Superlatticesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Scienceen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics; Blackett Laboratory; Imperial College London; London SW7 2AZ UKen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL); Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH); Heraklion 71003 Greeceen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Processes (ICEHT); Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH); Stadiou Strasse Platani; P.O. Box 1414 Patras GR-265 04 Greeceen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter of Materials Technology and Photonics and Electrical Engineering Department; Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete; Heraklion 71004 Greeceen
dc.contributor.institutionPhysics Department; Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; Thessaloniki 54124 Greeceen
dc.contributor.institutionCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source; Wilson Laboratory; Cornell University; Ithaca NY 14853 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials and Centre for Plastic Electronics; Imperial College London; London Royal School of Mines; London SW7 2AZ UKen
dc.contributor.institutionDutch Polymer Institute (DPI), AX, Eindhoven, The Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionMaterials Science & Technology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greeceen
kaust.authorZhao, Kuien
kaust.authorAmassian, Aramen
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