Impacts of Climate Modes on Air–Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/555872
Title:
Impacts of Climate Modes on Air–Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea
Authors:
Abualnaja, Yasser; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Josey, Simon A.; Hoteit, Ibrahim ( 0000-0002-3751-4393 ) ; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Raitsos, Dionysios E.
Abstract:
The impacts of various climate modes on the Red Sea surface heat exchange are investigated using the MERRA reanalysis and the OAFlux satellite reanalysis datasets. Seasonality in the atmospheric forcing is also explored. Mode impacts peak during boreal winter [December–February (DJF)] with average anomalies of 12–18 W m−2 to be found in the northern Red Sea. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the east Atlantic–west Russia (EAWR) pattern, and the Indian monsoon index (IMI) exhibit the strongest influence on the air–sea heat exchange during the winter. In this season, the largest negative anomalies of about −30 W m−2 are associated with the EAWR pattern over the central part of the Red Sea. In other seasons, mode-related anomalies are considerably lower, especially during spring when the mode impacts are negligible. The mode impacts are strongest over the northern half of the Red Sea during winter and autumn. In summer, the southern half of the basin is strongly influenced by the multivariate ENSO index (MEI). The winter mode–related anomalies are determined mostly by the latent heat flux component, while in summer the shortwave flux is also important. The influence of the modes on the Red Sea is found to be generally weaker than on the neighboring Mediterranean basin.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Impacts of Climate Modes on Air–Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea 2015, 28 (7):2665 Journal of Climate
Journal:
Journal of Climate
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2015
DOI:
10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00379.1
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0894-8755; 1520-0442
Additional Links:
http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00379.1
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAbualnaja, Yasseren
dc.contributor.authorPapadopoulos, Vassilis P.en
dc.contributor.authorJosey, Simon A.en
dc.contributor.authorHoteit, Ibrahimen
dc.contributor.authorKontoyiannis, Harilaosen
dc.contributor.authorRaitsos, Dionysios E.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-27T12:03:28Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-27T12:03:28Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-01en
dc.identifier.citationImpacts of Climate Modes on Air–Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea 2015, 28 (7):2665 Journal of Climateen
dc.identifier.issn0894-8755en
dc.identifier.issn1520-0442en
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00379.1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/555872en
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of various climate modes on the Red Sea surface heat exchange are investigated using the MERRA reanalysis and the OAFlux satellite reanalysis datasets. Seasonality in the atmospheric forcing is also explored. Mode impacts peak during boreal winter [December–February (DJF)] with average anomalies of 12–18 W m−2 to be found in the northern Red Sea. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the east Atlantic–west Russia (EAWR) pattern, and the Indian monsoon index (IMI) exhibit the strongest influence on the air–sea heat exchange during the winter. In this season, the largest negative anomalies of about −30 W m−2 are associated with the EAWR pattern over the central part of the Red Sea. In other seasons, mode-related anomalies are considerably lower, especially during spring when the mode impacts are negligible. The mode impacts are strongest over the northern half of the Red Sea during winter and autumn. In summer, the southern half of the basin is strongly influenced by the multivariate ENSO index (MEI). The winter mode–related anomalies are determined mostly by the latent heat flux component, while in summer the shortwave flux is also important. The influence of the modes on the Red Sea is found to be generally weaker than on the neighboring Mediterranean basin.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00379.1en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Climateen
dc.subjectAtmosphere-ocean interactionen
dc.subjectHeat budgets/fluxesen
dc.subjectClimate variabilityen
dc.subjectAtmosphere-ocean interactionen
dc.subjectAir-sea interactionen
dc.titleImpacts of Climate Modes on Air–Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Seaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Climateen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionHellenic Centre for Marine Research, Anavissos, Greeceen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionPlymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, Devon, United Kingdomen
kaust.authorAbualnaja, Yasseren
kaust.authorHoteit, Ibrahimen
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