A review of ecogeochemistry approaches to estimating movements of marine animals

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/555799
Title:
A review of ecogeochemistry approaches to estimating movements of marine animals
Authors:
McMahon, Kelton W.; Ling Hamady, Li; Thorrold, Simon R. ( 0000-0002-1533-7517 )
Abstract:
Ecogeochemistry—the application of geochemical techniques to fundamental questions in population and community ecology—has been used in animal migration studies in terrestrial environments for several decades; however, the approach has received far less attention in marine systems. This review includes comprehensive meta-analyses of organic zooplankton δ13C and δ15N values at the base of the food web, dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C values, and seawater δ18O values to create, for the first time, robust isoscapes for the Atlantic Ocean. These isoscapes present far greater geographic variability in multiple geochemical tracers than was previously thought, thus forming the foundation for reconstructions of habitat use and migration patterns of marine organisms. We review several additional tracers, including trace-element-to-calcium ratios and heavy element stable isotopes, to examine anadromous migrations. We highlight the value of the ecogeochemistry approach by examining case studies on three components of connectivity: dispersal and natal homing, functional connectivity, and migratory connectivity. We also discuss recent advances in compound-specific stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses for tracking animal movement. A better understanding of isotopic routing and fractionation factors, particularly of individual compound classes, is necessary to realize the full potential of ecogeochemistry.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
A review of ecogeochemistry approaches to estimating movements of marine animals 2013, 58 (2):697 Limnology and Oceanography
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Limnology and Oceanography
Issue Date:
22-Mar-2013
DOI:
10.4319/lo.2013.58.2.0697
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00243590
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.4319/lo.2013.58.2.0697
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Kelton W.en
dc.contributor.authorLing Hamady, Lien
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-26T08:05:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-26T08:05:48Zen
dc.date.issued2013-03-22en
dc.identifier.citationA review of ecogeochemistry approaches to estimating movements of marine animals 2013, 58 (2):697 Limnology and Oceanographyen
dc.identifier.issn00243590en
dc.identifier.doi10.4319/lo.2013.58.2.0697en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/555799en
dc.description.abstractEcogeochemistry—the application of geochemical techniques to fundamental questions in population and community ecology—has been used in animal migration studies in terrestrial environments for several decades; however, the approach has received far less attention in marine systems. This review includes comprehensive meta-analyses of organic zooplankton δ13C and δ15N values at the base of the food web, dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C values, and seawater δ18O values to create, for the first time, robust isoscapes for the Atlantic Ocean. These isoscapes present far greater geographic variability in multiple geochemical tracers than was previously thought, thus forming the foundation for reconstructions of habitat use and migration patterns of marine organisms. We review several additional tracers, including trace-element-to-calcium ratios and heavy element stable isotopes, to examine anadromous migrations. We highlight the value of the ecogeochemistry approach by examining case studies on three components of connectivity: dispersal and natal homing, functional connectivity, and migratory connectivity. We also discuss recent advances in compound-specific stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses for tracking animal movement. A better understanding of isotopic routing and fractionation factors, particularly of individual compound classes, is necessary to realize the full potential of ecogeochemistry.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.4319/lo.2013.58.2.0697en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Limnology and Oceanographyen
dc.titleA review of ecogeochemistry approaches to estimating movements of marine animalsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalLimnology and Oceanographyen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusettsen
dc.contributor.institutionOcean Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, Californiaen
kaust.authorMcMahon, Keltonen
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