Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/554105
Title:
Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns
Authors:
Bougouffa, Salim ( 0000-0001-9218-6452 ) ; Yang, J. K.; Lee, O. O.; Wang, Y.; Batang, Zenon B. ( 0000-0003-4593-0589 ) ; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Qian, P. Y.
Abstract:
Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.
KAUST Department:
KAUST Global Collaborative Research Program; Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab
Citation:
Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns 2013, 79 (11):3425 Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Journal:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Issue Date:
29-Mar-2013
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.00254-13
PubMed ID:
23542623
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3648036
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0099-2240
Additional Links:
http://aem.asm.org/cgi/doi/10.1128/AEM.00254-13
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab; Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBougouffa, Salimen
dc.contributor.authorYang, J. K.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, O. O.en
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y.en
dc.contributor.authorBatang, Zenon B.en
dc.contributor.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.en
dc.contributor.authorQian, P. Y.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-18T21:53:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-18T21:53:15Zen
dc.date.issued2013-03-29en
dc.identifier.citationDistinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns 2013, 79 (11):3425 Applied and Environmental Microbiologyen
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240en
dc.identifier.pmid23542623en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.00254-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/554105en
dc.description.abstractAtlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.en
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://aem.asm.org/cgi/doi/10.1128/AEM.00254-13en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Applied and Environmental Microbiologyen
dc.titleDistinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columnsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Global Collaborative Research Programen
dc.contributor.departmentCoastal and Marine Resources Core Laben
dc.identifier.journalApplied and Environmental Microbiologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3648036en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong, Chinaen
kaust.authorAl-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.en
kaust.authorBatang, Zenon B.en

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