Eddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical study

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/552197
Title:
Eddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical study
Authors:
Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim ( 0000-0002-3751-4393 )
Abstract:
Sea level anomaly (SLA) data spanning 1992–2012 were analyzed to study the statistical properties of eddies in the Red Sea. An algorithm that identifies winding angles was employed to detect 4998 eddies propagating along 938 unique eddy tracks. Statistics suggest that eddies are generated across the entire Red Sea but that they are prevalent in certain regions. A high number of eddies is found in the central basin between 18°N and 24°N. More than 87% of the detected eddies have a radius ranging from 50 to 135 km. Both the intensity and relative vorticity scale of these eddies decrease as the eddy radii increase. The averaged eddy lifespan is approximately 6 weeks. AEs and cyclonic eddies (CEs) have different deformation features, and those with stronger intensities are less deformed and more circular. Analysis of long-lived eddies suggests that they are likely to appear in the central basin with AEs tending to move northward. In addition, their eddy kinetic energy (EKE) increases gradually throughout their lifespans. The annual cycles of CEs and AEs differ, although both exhibit significant seasonal cycles of intensity with the winter and summer peaks appearing in February and August, respectively. The seasonal cycle of EKE is negatively correlated with stratification but positively correlated with vertical shear of horizontal velocity and eddy growth rate, suggesting that the generation of baroclinic instability is responsible for the activities of eddies in the Red Sea.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Eddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical study 2014, 119 (6):3909 Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Journal:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
DOI:
10.1002/2013JC009563
Type:
Article
ISSN:
21699275
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JC009563
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhan, Pengen
dc.contributor.authorSubramanian, Aneesh C.en
dc.contributor.authorYao, Fengchaoen
dc.contributor.authorHoteit, Ibrahimen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-04T16:38:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-04T16:38:54Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06en
dc.identifier.citationEddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical study 2014, 119 (6):3909 Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceansen
dc.identifier.issn21699275en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2013JC009563en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/552197en
dc.description.abstractSea level anomaly (SLA) data spanning 1992–2012 were analyzed to study the statistical properties of eddies in the Red Sea. An algorithm that identifies winding angles was employed to detect 4998 eddies propagating along 938 unique eddy tracks. Statistics suggest that eddies are generated across the entire Red Sea but that they are prevalent in certain regions. A high number of eddies is found in the central basin between 18°N and 24°N. More than 87% of the detected eddies have a radius ranging from 50 to 135 km. Both the intensity and relative vorticity scale of these eddies decrease as the eddy radii increase. The averaged eddy lifespan is approximately 6 weeks. AEs and cyclonic eddies (CEs) have different deformation features, and those with stronger intensities are less deformed and more circular. Analysis of long-lived eddies suggests that they are likely to appear in the central basin with AEs tending to move northward. In addition, their eddy kinetic energy (EKE) increases gradually throughout their lifespans. The annual cycles of CEs and AEs differ, although both exhibit significant seasonal cycles of intensity with the winter and summer peaks appearing in February and August, respectively. The seasonal cycle of EKE is negatively correlated with stratification but positively correlated with vertical shear of horizontal velocity and eddy growth rate, suggesting that the generation of baroclinic instability is responsible for the activities of eddies in the Red Sea.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2013JC009563en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceansen
dc.titleEddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceansen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionScripps Institution of Oceanography; University of California San Diego; La Jolla California USAen
kaust.authorZhan, Pengen
kaust.authorYao, Fengchaoen
kaust.authorHoteit, Ibrahimen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.