Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/552128
Title:
Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR
Authors:
Jonsson, Sigurjon ( 0000-0001-5378-7079 )
Abstract:
The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR 2012, 39 (21):n/a Geophysical Research Letters
Journal:
Geophysical Research Letters
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
DOI:
10.1029/2012GL053309
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00948276
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2012GL053309
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Sigurjonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-03T14:07:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-03T14:07:02Zen
dc.date.issued2012-11en
dc.identifier.citationTensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR 2012, 39 (21):n/a Geophysical Research Lettersen
dc.identifier.issn00948276en
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2012GL053309en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/552128en
dc.description.abstractThe large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1029/2012GL053309en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Geophysical Research Lettersen
dc.titleTensile rock mass strength estimated using InSARen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalGeophysical Research Lettersen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
kaust.authorJonsson, Sigurjonen
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