Bacterial community shift in the coastal Gulf of Mexico salt-marsh sediment microcosm in vitro following exposure to the Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252)

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/550841
Title:
Bacterial community shift in the coastal Gulf of Mexico salt-marsh sediment microcosm in vitro following exposure to the Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252)
Authors:
Koo, Hyunmin; Mojib, Nazia ( 0000-0003-4924-5538 ) ; Huang, Jonathan P.; Donahoe, Rona J.; Bej, Asim K.
Abstract:
In this study, we examined the responses by the indigenous bacterial communities in salt-marsh sediment microcosms in vitro following treatment with Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252). Microcosms were constructed of sediment and seawater collected from Bayou La Batre located in coastal Alabama on the Gulf of Mexico. We used an amplicon pyrosequencing approach on microcosm sediment metagenome targeting the V3–V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Overall, we identified a shift in the bacterial community in three distinct groups. The first group was the early responders (orders Pseudomonadales and Oceanospirillales within class Gammaproteobacteria), which increased their relative abundance within 2 weeks and were maintained 3 weeks after oil treatment. The second group was identified as early, but transient responders (order Rhodobacterales within class Alphaproteobacteria; class Epsilonproteobacteria), which increased their population by 2 weeks, but returned to the basal level 3 weeks after oil treatment. The third group was the late responders (order Clostridiales within phylum Firmicutes; order Methylococcales within class Gammaproteobacteria; and phylum Tenericutes), which only increased 3 weeks after oil treatment. Furthermore, we identified oil-sensitive bacterial taxa (order Chromatiales within class Gammaproteobacteria; order Syntrophobacterales within class Deltaproteobacteria), which decreased in their population after 2 weeks of oil treatment. Detection of alkane (alkB), catechol (C2,3DO) and biphenyl (bph) biodegradation genes by PCR, particularly in oil-treated sediment metacommunity DNA, delineates proliferation of the hydrocarbon degrading bacterial community. Overall, the indigenous bacterial communities in our salt-marsh sediment in vitro microcosm study responded rapidly and shifted towards members of the taxonomic groups that are capable of surviving in an MC252 oil-contaminated environment.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Bacterial community shift in the coastal Gulf of Mexico salt-marsh sediment microcosm in vitro following exposure to the Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252) 2014 3 Biotech
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
3 Biotech
Issue Date:
10-Jul-2014
DOI:
10.1007/s13205-014-0233-x
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2190-572X; 2190-5738
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13205-014-0233-x
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKoo, Hyunminen
dc.contributor.authorMojib, Naziaen
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jonathan P.en
dc.contributor.authorDonahoe, Rona J.en
dc.contributor.authorBej, Asim K.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-28T12:16:47Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-28T12:16:47Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-10en
dc.identifier.citationBacterial community shift in the coastal Gulf of Mexico salt-marsh sediment microcosm in vitro following exposure to the Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252) 2014 3 Biotechen
dc.identifier.issn2190-572Xen
dc.identifier.issn2190-5738en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13205-014-0233-xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/550841en
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we examined the responses by the indigenous bacterial communities in salt-marsh sediment microcosms in vitro following treatment with Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252). Microcosms were constructed of sediment and seawater collected from Bayou La Batre located in coastal Alabama on the Gulf of Mexico. We used an amplicon pyrosequencing approach on microcosm sediment metagenome targeting the V3–V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Overall, we identified a shift in the bacterial community in three distinct groups. The first group was the early responders (orders Pseudomonadales and Oceanospirillales within class Gammaproteobacteria), which increased their relative abundance within 2 weeks and were maintained 3 weeks after oil treatment. The second group was identified as early, but transient responders (order Rhodobacterales within class Alphaproteobacteria; class Epsilonproteobacteria), which increased their population by 2 weeks, but returned to the basal level 3 weeks after oil treatment. The third group was the late responders (order Clostridiales within phylum Firmicutes; order Methylococcales within class Gammaproteobacteria; and phylum Tenericutes), which only increased 3 weeks after oil treatment. Furthermore, we identified oil-sensitive bacterial taxa (order Chromatiales within class Gammaproteobacteria; order Syntrophobacterales within class Deltaproteobacteria), which decreased in their population after 2 weeks of oil treatment. Detection of alkane (alkB), catechol (C2,3DO) and biphenyl (bph) biodegradation genes by PCR, particularly in oil-treated sediment metacommunity DNA, delineates proliferation of the hydrocarbon degrading bacterial community. Overall, the indigenous bacterial communities in our salt-marsh sediment in vitro microcosm study responded rapidly and shifted towards members of the taxonomic groups that are capable of surviving in an MC252 oil-contaminated environment.en
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13205-014-0233-xen
dc.rightsThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, dis- tribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.en
dc.subjectOil spillen
dc.subjectQIIMEen
dc.subjectBioinformaticsen
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen
dc.subjectPyrosequencingen
dc.subjectBiodegradative genesen
dc.subjectPCRen
dc.titleBacterial community shift in the coastal Gulf of Mexico salt-marsh sediment microcosm in vitro following exposure to the Mississippi Canyon Block 252 oil (MC252)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journal3 Biotechen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1300 University Blvd., CH464, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1170, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0338, USAen
kaust.authorDonahoe, Rona J.en
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