Drought Variability and Land Degradation in Semiarid Regions: Assessment Using Remote Sensing Data and Drought Indices (1982–2011)

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/550823
Title:
Drought Variability and Land Degradation in Semiarid Regions: Assessment Using Remote Sensing Data and Drought Indices (1982–2011)
Authors:
Vicente-Serrano, Sergio; Cabello, Daniel; Tomás-Burguera, Miquel; Martín-Hernández, Natalia; Beguería, Santiago; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Kenawy, Ahmed
Abstract:
We analyzed potential land degradation processes in semiarid regions worldwide using long time series of remote sensing images and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for the period 1981 to 2011. The objectives of the study were to identify semiarid regions showing a marked decrease in potential vegetation activity, indicative of the occurrence of land degradation processes, and to assess the possible influence of the observed drought trends quantified using the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We found that the NDVI values recorded during the period of maximum vegetation activity (NDVImax) predominantly showed a positive evolution in the majority of the semiarid regions assessed, but NDVImax was highly correlated with drought variability, and the trends of drought events influenced trends in NDVImax at the global scale. The semiarid regions that showed most increase in NDVImax (the Sahel, northern Australia, South Africa) were characterized by a clear positive trend in the SPEI values, indicative of conditions of greater humidity and lesser drought conditions. While changes in drought severity may be an important driver of NDVI trends and land degradation processes in semiarid regions worldwide, drought did not apparently explain some of the observed changes in NDVImax. This reflects the complexity of vegetation activity processes in the world’s semiarid regions, and the difficulty of defining a universal response to drought in these regions, where a number of factors (natural and anthropogenic) may also affect on land degradation.
KAUST Department:
Hydrological Modeling & Earth Observation Group; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Drought Variability and Land Degradation in Semiarid Regions: Assessment Using Remote Sensing Data and Drought Indices (1982–2011) 2015, 7 (4):4391 Remote Sensing
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Journal:
Remote Sensing
Issue Date:
14-Apr-2015
DOI:
10.3390/rs70404391
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2072-4292
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/7/4/4391/
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVicente-Serrano, Sergioen
dc.contributor.authorCabello, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorTomás-Burguera, Miquelen
dc.contributor.authorMartín-Hernández, Nataliaen
dc.contributor.authorBeguería, Santiagoen
dc.contributor.authorAzorin-Molina, Cesaren
dc.contributor.authorKenawy, Ahmeden
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-28T12:30:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-28T12:30:40Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-14en
dc.identifier.citationDrought Variability and Land Degradation in Semiarid Regions: Assessment Using Remote Sensing Data and Drought Indices (1982–2011) 2015, 7 (4):4391 Remote Sensingen
dc.identifier.issn2072-4292en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/rs70404391en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/550823en
dc.description.abstractWe analyzed potential land degradation processes in semiarid regions worldwide using long time series of remote sensing images and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for the period 1981 to 2011. The objectives of the study were to identify semiarid regions showing a marked decrease in potential vegetation activity, indicative of the occurrence of land degradation processes, and to assess the possible influence of the observed drought trends quantified using the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We found that the NDVI values recorded during the period of maximum vegetation activity (NDVImax) predominantly showed a positive evolution in the majority of the semiarid regions assessed, but NDVImax was highly correlated with drought variability, and the trends of drought events influenced trends in NDVImax at the global scale. The semiarid regions that showed most increase in NDVImax (the Sahel, northern Australia, South Africa) were characterized by a clear positive trend in the SPEI values, indicative of conditions of greater humidity and lesser drought conditions. While changes in drought severity may be an important driver of NDVI trends and land degradation processes in semiarid regions worldwide, drought did not apparently explain some of the observed changes in NDVImax. This reflects the complexity of vegetation activity processes in the world’s semiarid regions, and the difficulty of defining a universal response to drought in these regions, where a number of factors (natural and anthropogenic) may also affect on land degradation.en
dc.publisherMDPI AGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/7/4/4391/en
dc.rightsThis article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.subjectStandardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI)en
dc.subjectNDVIen
dc.subjectNOAA-AVHRRen
dc.subjectGIMMSen
dc.subjectdesertificationen
dc.subjectvegetation recoveryen
dc.titleDrought Variability and Land Degradation in Semiarid Regions: Assessment Using Remote Sensing Data and Drought Indices (1982–2011)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHydrological Modeling & Earth Observation Groupen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalRemote Sensingen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto Pirenaico de Ecología, Spanish National Research Council (IPE-CSIC), Campus de Aula Dei, P.O. Box 13034, E-50059 Zaragoza, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Economy, University of Alcala, E-28801 Madrid, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionMadrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Water (IMDEA-Water), Alcalá de Henares, E-28805 Madrid, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionEstación Experimental de Aula Dei, Spanish National Research Council (EEAD-CSIC), Campus de Aula Dei, P.O. Box 13034, E-50059 Zaragoza, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geography, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura, Egypten
kaust.authorKenawy, Ahmeden
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.