A quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidification

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/346797
Title:
A quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidification
Authors:
Malvezzi, Alex J.; Murray, Christopher S.; Feldheim, Kevin A.; DiBattista, Joseph ( 0000-0002-5696-7574 ) ; Garant, Dany; Gobler, Christopher J.; Chapman, Demian D.; Baumann, Hannes
Abstract:
Assessing the potential of marine organisms to adapt genetically to increasing oceanic CO2 levels requires proxies such as heritability of fitness-related traits under ocean acidification (OA). We applied a quantitative genetic method to derive the first heritability estimate of survival under elevated CO2 conditions in a metazoan. Specifically, we reared offspring, selected from a wild coastal fish population (Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia), at high CO2 conditions (~2300 μatm) from fertilization to 15 days posthatch, which significantly reduced survival compared to controls. Perished and surviving offspring were quantitatively sampled and genotyped along with their parents, using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci, to reconstruct a parent-offspring pedigree and estimate variance components. Genetically related individuals were phenotypically more similar (i.e., survived similarly long at elevated CO2 conditions) than unrelated individuals, which translated into a significantly nonzero heritability (0.20 ± 0.07). The contribution of maternal effects was surprisingly small (0.05 ± 0.04) and nonsignificant. Survival among replicates was positively correlated with genetic diversity, particularly with observed heterozygosity. We conclude that early life survival of M. menidia under high CO2 levels has a significant additive genetic component that could elicit an evolutionary response to OA, depending on the strength and direction of future selection.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
A quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidification 2015:n/a Evolutionary Applications
Publisher:
Wiley Open Access
Journal:
Evolutionary Applications
Issue Date:
Feb-2015
DOI:
10.1111/eva.12248
PubMed ID:
25926880
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4408146
Type:
Article
ISSN:
17524571
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/eva.12248
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMalvezzi, Alex J.en
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Christopher S.en
dc.contributor.authorFeldheim, Kevin A.en
dc.contributor.authorDiBattista, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorGarant, Danyen
dc.contributor.authorGobler, Christopher J.en
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Demian D.en
dc.contributor.authorBaumann, Hannesen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-17T13:46:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-17T13:46:21Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02en
dc.identifier.citationA quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidification 2015:n/a Evolutionary Applicationsen
dc.identifier.issn17524571en
dc.identifier.pmid25926880en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eva.12248en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/346797en
dc.description.abstractAssessing the potential of marine organisms to adapt genetically to increasing oceanic CO2 levels requires proxies such as heritability of fitness-related traits under ocean acidification (OA). We applied a quantitative genetic method to derive the first heritability estimate of survival under elevated CO2 conditions in a metazoan. Specifically, we reared offspring, selected from a wild coastal fish population (Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia), at high CO2 conditions (~2300 μatm) from fertilization to 15 days posthatch, which significantly reduced survival compared to controls. Perished and surviving offspring were quantitatively sampled and genotyped along with their parents, using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci, to reconstruct a parent-offspring pedigree and estimate variance components. Genetically related individuals were phenotypically more similar (i.e., survived similarly long at elevated CO2 conditions) than unrelated individuals, which translated into a significantly nonzero heritability (0.20 ± 0.07). The contribution of maternal effects was surprisingly small (0.05 ± 0.04) and nonsignificant. Survival among replicates was positively correlated with genetic diversity, particularly with observed heterozygosity. We conclude that early life survival of M. menidia under high CO2 levels has a significant additive genetic component that could elicit an evolutionary response to OA, depending on the strength and direction of future selection.en
dc.publisherWiley Open Accessen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/eva.12248en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.titleA quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidificationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalEvolutionary Applicationsen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4408146en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences; Stony Brook University; Stony Brook NY USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marine Sciences; University of Connecticut; Groton CT USAen
dc.contributor.institutionPritzker Laboratory for Molecular Systematics and Evolution; Field Museum of Natural History; Chicago IL USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDépartement de Biologie; Université de Sherbrooke; Sherbrooke QC Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences; Stony Brook University; Stony Brook NY USAen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences; Stony Brook University; Stony Brook NY USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marine Sciences; University of Connecticut; Groton CT USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorDiBattista, Josephen
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