Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/346612
Title:
Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens
Authors:
Ederli, Luisa; Dawe, Adam; Pasqualini, Stefania; Quaglia, Mara; Xiong, Liming ( 0000-0001-8099-0806 ) ; Gehring, Christoph A. ( 0000-0003-4355-4591 )
Abstract:
We investigated whether the Arabidopsis flower evolved protective measures to increase reproductive success. Firstly, analyses of available transcriptome data show that the most highly expressed transcripts in the closed sepal (stage 12) are enriched in genes with roles in responses to chemical stimuli and cellular metabolic processes. At stage 15, there is enrichment in transcripts with a role in responses to biotic stimuli. Comparative analyses between the sepal and petal in the open flower mark an over-representation of transcripts with a role in responses to stress and catalytic activity. Secondly, the content of the biotic defense-associated phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) in sepals and petals is significantly higher than in leaves. To understand whether the high levels of stress responsive transcripts and the higher SA content affect defense, wild-type plants (Col-0) and transgenic plants defective in SA accumulation (nahG) were challenged with the biotrophic fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum, the causal agent of powdery mildew, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. NahG leaves were more sensitive than those of Col-0, suggesting that in leaves SA has a role in the defense against biotrophs. In contrast, sepals and petals of both genotypes were resistant to G. cichoracearum, indicating that in the flower, resistance to the biotrophic pathogen is not critically dependent on SA, but likely dependent on the up-regulation of stress-responsive genes. Since sepals and petals of both genotypes are equally susceptible to B. cinerea, we conclude that neither stress-response genes nor increased SA accumulation offers protection against the necrotrophic pathogen. These results are interpreted in the light of the distinctive role of the flower and we propose that in the early stages, the sepal may act as a chemical defense barrier of the developing reproductive structures against biotrophic pathogens.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens 2015, 6 Frontiers in Plant Science
Publisher:
Frontiers Media SA
Journal:
Frontiers in Plant Science
Issue Date:
20-Feb-2015
DOI:
10.3389/fpls.2015.00079
PubMed ID:
25750645
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4335275
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1664-462X
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/Article/10.3389/fpls.2015.00079/abstract
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEderli, Luisaen
dc.contributor.authorDawe, Adamen
dc.contributor.authorPasqualini, Stefaniaen
dc.contributor.authorQuaglia, Maraen
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Limingen
dc.contributor.authorGehring, Christoph A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-15T14:00:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-15T14:00:27Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-20en
dc.identifier.citationArabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens 2015, 6 Frontiers in Plant Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn1664-462Xen
dc.identifier.pmid25750645en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpls.2015.00079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/346612en
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether the Arabidopsis flower evolved protective measures to increase reproductive success. Firstly, analyses of available transcriptome data show that the most highly expressed transcripts in the closed sepal (stage 12) are enriched in genes with roles in responses to chemical stimuli and cellular metabolic processes. At stage 15, there is enrichment in transcripts with a role in responses to biotic stimuli. Comparative analyses between the sepal and petal in the open flower mark an over-representation of transcripts with a role in responses to stress and catalytic activity. Secondly, the content of the biotic defense-associated phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) in sepals and petals is significantly higher than in leaves. To understand whether the high levels of stress responsive transcripts and the higher SA content affect defense, wild-type plants (Col-0) and transgenic plants defective in SA accumulation (nahG) were challenged with the biotrophic fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum, the causal agent of powdery mildew, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. NahG leaves were more sensitive than those of Col-0, suggesting that in leaves SA has a role in the defense against biotrophs. In contrast, sepals and petals of both genotypes were resistant to G. cichoracearum, indicating that in the flower, resistance to the biotrophic pathogen is not critically dependent on SA, but likely dependent on the up-regulation of stress-responsive genes. Since sepals and petals of both genotypes are equally susceptible to B. cinerea, we conclude that neither stress-response genes nor increased SA accumulation offers protection against the necrotrophic pathogen. These results are interpreted in the light of the distinctive role of the flower and we propose that in the early stages, the sepal may act as a chemical defense barrier of the developing reproductive structures against biotrophic pathogens.en
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/Article/10.3389/fpls.2015.00079/abstracten
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.titleArabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogensen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Plant Scienceen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4335275en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italyen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorDawe, Adam Seanen
kaust.authorXiong, Limingen
kaust.authorGehring, Christoph A.en
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.