Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/336989
Title:
Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters
Authors:
Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.; Sauder, Laura A.; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D.; Boon, Nico; Poulain, Alexandre
Abstract:
Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium biofilters, and that AOA community composition within a given aquarium is stable over time and across biofilter support material types.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Bagchi S, Vlaeminck SE, Sauder LA, Mosquera M, Neufeld JD, et al. (2014) Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters. PLoS ONE 9(12): e113515. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0113515
Publisher:
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
5-Dec-2014
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0113515
PubMed ID:
25479061
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4257543
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Sponsors:
S.B. was supported by a scholarship from the Flemish Government (1F2B8M/JDW/2010-2011/10-BTL-IND-01) on a bilateral cultural cooperation program; S.E.V. was supported as a postdoctoral fellow from the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO-Vlaanderen); and L.S. and J.D.N. were supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0113515
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBagchi, Samiken
dc.contributor.authorVlaeminck, Siegfried E.en
dc.contributor.authorSauder, Laura A.en
dc.contributor.authorMosquera, Marielaen
dc.contributor.authorNeufeld, Josh D.en
dc.contributor.authorBoon, Nicoen
dc.contributor.authorPoulain, Alexandreen
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T13:50:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T13:50:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014-12-05en
dc.identifier.citationBagchi S, Vlaeminck SE, Sauder LA, Mosquera M, Neufeld JD, et al. (2014) Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters. PLoS ONE 9(12): e113515. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0113515en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.pmid25479061en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0113515en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/336989en
dc.description.abstractNitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium biofilters, and that AOA community composition within a given aquarium is stable over time and across biofilter support material types.en
dc.description.sponsorshipS.B. was supported by a scholarship from the Flemish Government (1F2B8M/JDW/2010-2011/10-BTL-IND-01) on a bilateral cultural cooperation program; S.E.V. was supported as a postdoctoral fellow from the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO-Vlaanderen); and L.S. and J.D.N. were supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0113515en
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectAmmoniaen
dc.subjectDenaturing gradient gel electrophoresisen
dc.subjectFresh wateren
dc.subjectMarine biologyen
dc.subjectMarine fishen
dc.subjectNitratesen
dc.subjectNitrificationen
dc.subjectRibosomal RNAen
dc.titleTemporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofiltersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4257543en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canadaen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorPoulain, Alexandreen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.