Multiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australia

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/336086
Title:
Multiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australia
Authors:
Neave, Matthew; Luter, Heidi; Padovan, Anna; Townsend, Simon; Schobben, Xavier; Gibb, Karen
Abstract:
Microbial source tracking is an area of research in which multiple approaches are used to identify the sources of elevated bacterial concentrations in recreational lakes and beaches. At our study location in Darwin, northern Australia, water quality in the harbor is generally good, however dry-season beach closures due to elevated Escherichia coli and enterococci counts are a cause for concern. The sources of these high bacteria counts are currently unknown. To address this, we sampled sewage outfalls, other potential inputs, such as urban rivers and drains, and surrounding beaches, and used genetic fingerprints from E. coli and enterococci communities, fecal markers and 454 pyrosequencing to track contamination sources. A sewage effluent outfall (Larrakeyah discharge) was a source of bacteria, including fecal bacteria that impacted nearby beaches. Two other treated effluent discharges did not appear to influence sites other than those directly adjacent. Several beaches contained fecal indicator bacteria that likely originated from urban rivers and creeks within the catchment. Generally, connectivity between the sites was observed within distinct geographical locations and it appeared that most of the bacterial contamination on Darwin beaches was confined to local sources.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Neave, M., Luter, H., Padovan, A., Townsend, S., Schobben, X. and Gibb, K. (2014), Multiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australia. MicrobiologyOpen. doi: 10.1002/mbo3.209
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
MicrobiologyOpen
Issue Date:
16-Sep-2014
DOI:
10.1002/mbo3.209
PubMed ID:
25224738
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4263510
Type:
Article
ISSN:
20458827
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/mbo3.209
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNeave, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorLuter, Heidien
dc.contributor.authorPadovan, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorSchobben, Xavieren
dc.contributor.authorGibb, Karenen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T13:22:11Zen
dc.date.available2014-11-25T13:22:11Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09-16en
dc.identifier.citationNeave, M., Luter, H., Padovan, A., Townsend, S., Schobben, X. and Gibb, K. (2014), Multiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australia. MicrobiologyOpen. doi: 10.1002/mbo3.209en
dc.identifier.issn20458827en
dc.identifier.pmid25224738en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mbo3.209en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/336086en
dc.description.abstractMicrobial source tracking is an area of research in which multiple approaches are used to identify the sources of elevated bacterial concentrations in recreational lakes and beaches. At our study location in Darwin, northern Australia, water quality in the harbor is generally good, however dry-season beach closures due to elevated Escherichia coli and enterococci counts are a cause for concern. The sources of these high bacteria counts are currently unknown. To address this, we sampled sewage outfalls, other potential inputs, such as urban rivers and drains, and surrounding beaches, and used genetic fingerprints from E. coli and enterococci communities, fecal markers and 454 pyrosequencing to track contamination sources. A sewage effluent outfall (Larrakeyah discharge) was a source of bacteria, including fecal bacteria that impacted nearby beaches. Two other treated effluent discharges did not appear to influence sites other than those directly adjacent. Several beaches contained fecal indicator bacteria that likely originated from urban rivers and creeks within the catchment. Generally, connectivity between the sites was observed within distinct geographical locations and it appeared that most of the bacterial contamination on Darwin beaches was confined to local sources.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/mbo3.209en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subject454 Pyrosequencingen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectbacteriaen
dc.subjectDGGEen
dc.subjectfecalen
dc.subjectsewageen
dc.subjecttrackingen
dc.subjecttropicalen
dc.titleMultiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalMicrobiologyOpenen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4263510en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionResearch Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods; Charles Darwin University; Casuarina Northern Territory Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Land Resource Management; Northern Territory Government; Palmerston Northern Territory Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Health; Northern Territory Government; Casuarina Northern Territory Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusettsen
dc.contributor.institutionNorthern Australian Marine Research Alliance, Arafura Timor Research Facility Darwin, Brinkin, Northern Territory, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
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