Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish (Plectropomus spp., Serranidae)

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/334544
Title:
Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish (Plectropomus spp., Serranidae)
Authors:
Harrison, H.B.; Feldheim, K.A.; Jones, G.P.; Ma, K.; Mansour, H.; Perumal, S.; Williamson, D.H.; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 )
Abstract:
Microsatellites are often considered ideal markers to investigate ecological processes in animal populations. They are regularly used as genetic barcodes to identify species, individuals, and infer familial relationships. However, such applications are highly sensitive the number and diversity of microsatellite markers, which are also prone to error. Here, we propose a novel framework to assess the suitability of microsatellite datasets for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two closely related species of coral reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus and P. maculatus (Serranidae). Coral trout are important fisheries species throughout the Indo-Pacific region and have been shown to hybridize in parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We first describe the development of 25 microsatellite loci and their integration to three multiplex PCRs that co-amplify in both species. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the complete suite of markers provides appropriate power to discriminate between species, detect hybrid individuals, and resolve parent-offspring relationships in natural populations, with over 99.6% accuracy in parent-offspring assignments. The markers were also tested on seven additional species within the Plectropomus genus with polymorphism in 28-96% of loci. The multiplex PCRs developed here provide a reliable and cost-effective strategy to investigate evolutionary and ecological dynamics and will be broadly applicable in studies of wild populations and aquaculture brood stocks for these closely related fish species. 2014 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Biosciences Core Lab; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Harrison HB, Feldheim KA, Jones GP, Ma K, Mansour H, et al. (2014) Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish ( Plectropomus spp ., Serranidae) . Ecology and Evolution: n/a-n/a. doi:10.1002/ece3.1002.
Publisher:
Wiley Open Access
Journal:
Ecology and Evolution
Issue Date:
24-Apr-2014
DOI:
10.1002/ece3.1002
PubMed ID:
25360247
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4201420
Type:
Article
ISSN:
20457758
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biosciences Core Lab

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, H.B.en
dc.contributor.authorFeldheim, K.A.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, G.P.en
dc.contributor.authorMa, K.en
dc.contributor.authorMansour, H.en
dc.contributor.authorPerumal, S.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, D.H.en
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-11T14:29:07Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-11T14:29:07Z-
dc.date.issued2014-04-24en
dc.identifier.citationHarrison HB, Feldheim KA, Jones GP, Ma K, Mansour H, et al. (2014) Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish ( Plectropomus spp ., Serranidae) . Ecology and Evolution: n/a-n/a. doi:10.1002/ece3.1002.en
dc.identifier.issn20457758en
dc.identifier.pmid25360247en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.1002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/334544en
dc.description.abstractMicrosatellites are often considered ideal markers to investigate ecological processes in animal populations. They are regularly used as genetic barcodes to identify species, individuals, and infer familial relationships. However, such applications are highly sensitive the number and diversity of microsatellite markers, which are also prone to error. Here, we propose a novel framework to assess the suitability of microsatellite datasets for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two closely related species of coral reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus and P. maculatus (Serranidae). Coral trout are important fisheries species throughout the Indo-Pacific region and have been shown to hybridize in parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We first describe the development of 25 microsatellite loci and their integration to three multiplex PCRs that co-amplify in both species. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the complete suite of markers provides appropriate power to discriminate between species, detect hybrid individuals, and resolve parent-offspring relationships in natural populations, with over 99.6% accuracy in parent-offspring assignments. The markers were also tested on seven additional species within the Plectropomus genus with polymorphism in 28-96% of loci. The multiplex PCRs developed here provide a reliable and cost-effective strategy to investigate evolutionary and ecological dynamics and will be broadly applicable in studies of wild populations and aquaculture brood stocks for these closely related fish species. 2014 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Open Accessen
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Ecology and Evolutionen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectCoral trouten
dc.subjectHybridizationen
dc.subjectMicrosatellite multiplexen
dc.subjectParentage analysisen
dc.subjectPlectropomus sppen
dc.titleValidation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish (Plectropomus spp., Serranidae)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiosciences Core Laben
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalEcology and Evolutionen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4201420en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionPritzker Laboratory for Molecular Systematics and Evolution, Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago 60605, Illinois, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorMansour, Hichamen
kaust.authorPerumal, Sadhasivamen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en

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