Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/334539
Title:
Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells
Authors:
Mink, J.E.; Qaisi, R.M.; Logan, B.E.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa ( 0000-0003-3279-0441 )
Abstract:
Micro-sized microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are miniature energy harvesters that use bacteria to convert biomass from liquids into usable power. The key challenge is transitioning laboratory test beds into devices capable of producing high power using readily available fuel sources. Here, we present a pragmatic step toward advancing MFC applications through the fabrication of a uniquely mobile and inexpensive micro-sized device that can be fueled with human saliva. The 25-ll MFC was fabricated with graphene, a two-dimensional atomic crystal-structured material, as an anode for efficient current generation and with an air cathode for enabling the use of the oxygen present in air, making its operation completely mobile and free of the need for laboratory chemicals. With saliva as a fuel, the device produced higher current densities (1190 Am-3) than any previous aircathode micro-sized MFCs. The use of the graphene anode generated 40 times more power than that possible using a carbon cloth anode. Additional tests were performed using acetate, a conventional organic material, at high organic loadings that were comparable to those in saliva, and the results demonstrated a linear relationship between the organic loading and current. These findings open the door to saliva-powered applications of this fuel cell technology for Lab-on-a-Chip devices or portable point-of-care diagnostic devices. 2014 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 1884-4057/14.
KAUST Department:
Integrated Nanotechnology Lab; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Mink JE, Qaisi RM, Logan BE, Hussain MM (2014) Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells. NPG Asia Mater 6: e89. doi:10.1038/am.2014.1.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
NPG Asia Materials
Issue Date:
7-Mar-2014
DOI:
10.1038/am.2014.1
Type:
Article
ISSN:
18844049
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Integrated Nanotechnology Lab; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMink, J.E.en
dc.contributor.authorQaisi, R.M.en
dc.contributor.authorLogan, B.E.en
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Muhammad Mustafaen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-11T14:28:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-11T14:28:56Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-07en
dc.identifier.citationMink JE, Qaisi RM, Logan BE, Hussain MM (2014) Energy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cells. NPG Asia Mater 6: e89. doi:10.1038/am.2014.1.en
dc.identifier.issn18844049en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/am.2014.1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/334539en
dc.description.abstractMicro-sized microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are miniature energy harvesters that use bacteria to convert biomass from liquids into usable power. The key challenge is transitioning laboratory test beds into devices capable of producing high power using readily available fuel sources. Here, we present a pragmatic step toward advancing MFC applications through the fabrication of a uniquely mobile and inexpensive micro-sized device that can be fueled with human saliva. The 25-ll MFC was fabricated with graphene, a two-dimensional atomic crystal-structured material, as an anode for efficient current generation and with an air cathode for enabling the use of the oxygen present in air, making its operation completely mobile and free of the need for laboratory chemicals. With saliva as a fuel, the device produced higher current densities (1190 Am-3) than any previous aircathode micro-sized MFCs. The use of the graphene anode generated 40 times more power than that possible using a carbon cloth anode. Additional tests were performed using acetate, a conventional organic material, at high organic loadings that were comparable to those in saliva, and the results demonstrated a linear relationship between the organic loading and current. These findings open the door to saliva-powered applications of this fuel cell technology for Lab-on-a-Chip devices or portable point-of-care diagnostic devices. 2014 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 1884-4057/14.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en
dc.subjectGrapheneen
dc.subjectMicrobial fuel cellen
dc.subjectSalivaen
dc.subjectCurrent generationen
dc.subjectFuel cell technologiesen
dc.subjectHigh organic loadingen
dc.subjectLab-on-a-chip devicesen
dc.subjectLinear relationshipsen
dc.subjectMicrobial fuel cells (MFCs)en
dc.subjectPoint-of-care diagnosticsen
dc.subjectEnergy harvestingen
dc.subjectEquipment testingen
dc.subjectMicrobial fuel cellsen
dc.subjectBody fluidsen
dc.titleEnergy harvesting from organic liquids in micro-sized microbial fuel cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentIntegrated Nanotechnology Laben
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalNPG Asia Materialsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorMink, Justine E.en
kaust.authorQaisi, Ramy M.en
kaust.authorHussain, Muhammad Mustafaen
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