A comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325444
Title:
A comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana
Authors:
Orsini, Francesco; D'Urzo, Matilde Paino; Inan, Gunsu; Serra, Sara; Oh, Dong-Ha; Mickelbart, Michael V.; Consiglio, Federica; Li, Xia; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bohnert, Hans J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Maggio, Albino
Abstract:
Salinity is an abiotic stress that limits both yield and the expansion of agricultural crops to new areas. In the last 20 years our basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance and adaptation to saline environments has greatly improved owing to active development of advanced tools in molecular, genomics, and bioinformatics analyses. However, the full potential of investigative power has not been fully exploited, because the use of halophytes as model systems in plant salt tolerance research is largely neglected. The recent introduction of halophytic Arabidopsis-Relative Model Species (ARMS) has begun to compare and relate several unique genetic resources to the well-developed Arabidopsis model. In a search for candidates to begin to understand, through genetic analyses, the biological bases of salt tolerance, 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared: Barbarea verna, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hirschfeldia incana, Lepidium densiflorum, Malcolmia triloba, Lepidium virginicum, Descurainia pinnata, Sisymbrium officinale, Thellungiella parvula, Thellungiella salsuginea (previously T. halophila), and Thlaspi arvense. Among these species, highly salt-tolerant (L. densiflorum and L. virginicum) and moderately salt-tolerant (M. triloba and H. incana) species were identified. Only T. parvula revealed a true halophytic habitus, comparable to the better studied Thellungiella salsuginea. Major differences in growth, water transport properties, and ion accumulation are observed and discussed to describe the distinctive traits and physiological responses that can now be studied genetically in salt stress research. 2010 The Author.
KAUST Department:
Plant Stress Genomics Research Lab
Citation:
Orsini F, D'Urzo MP, Inan G, Serra S, Oh D-H, et al. (2010) A comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana. Journal of Experimental Botany 61: 3787-3798. doi:10.1093/jxb/erq188.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (OUP)
Journal:
Journal of Experimental Botany
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2010
DOI:
10.1093/jxb/erq188
PubMed ID:
20595237
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2921208
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00220957
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOrsini, Francescoen
dc.contributor.authorD'Urzo, Matilde Painoen
dc.contributor.authorInan, Gunsuen
dc.contributor.authorSerra, Saraen
dc.contributor.authorOh, Dong-Haen
dc.contributor.authorMickelbart, Michael V.en
dc.contributor.authorConsiglio, Federicaen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xiaen
dc.contributor.authorJeong, Jae Cheolen
dc.contributor.authorYun, Dae-Jinen
dc.contributor.authorBohnert, Hans J.en
dc.contributor.authorBressan, Ray A.en
dc.contributor.authorMaggio, Albinoen
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:51:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:51:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010-07-01en
dc.identifier.citationOrsini F, D'Urzo MP, Inan G, Serra S, Oh D-H, et al. (2010) A comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana. Journal of Experimental Botany 61: 3787-3798. doi:10.1093/jxb/erq188.en
dc.identifier.issn00220957en
dc.identifier.pmid20595237en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jxb/erq188en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325444en
dc.description.abstractSalinity is an abiotic stress that limits both yield and the expansion of agricultural crops to new areas. In the last 20 years our basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance and adaptation to saline environments has greatly improved owing to active development of advanced tools in molecular, genomics, and bioinformatics analyses. However, the full potential of investigative power has not been fully exploited, because the use of halophytes as model systems in plant salt tolerance research is largely neglected. The recent introduction of halophytic Arabidopsis-Relative Model Species (ARMS) has begun to compare and relate several unique genetic resources to the well-developed Arabidopsis model. In a search for candidates to begin to understand, through genetic analyses, the biological bases of salt tolerance, 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared: Barbarea verna, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hirschfeldia incana, Lepidium densiflorum, Malcolmia triloba, Lepidium virginicum, Descurainia pinnata, Sisymbrium officinale, Thellungiella parvula, Thellungiella salsuginea (previously T. halophila), and Thlaspi arvense. Among these species, highly salt-tolerant (L. densiflorum and L. virginicum) and moderately salt-tolerant (M. triloba and H. incana) species were identified. Only T. parvula revealed a true halophytic habitus, comparable to the better studied Thellungiella salsuginea. Major differences in growth, water transport properties, and ion accumulation are observed and discussed to describe the distinctive traits and physiological responses that can now be studied genetically in salt stress research. 2010 The Author.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This paper is available online free of all access charges (see http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/open_access.html for further details)en
dc.subjectGerminationen
dc.subjecthalophytesen
dc.subjection contentsen
dc.subjectroot elongationen
dc.subjectstomataen
dc.subjectwater relationsen
dc.subjectpotassiumen
dc.subjectsodiumen
dc.subjectsodium chlorideen
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectBrassicaceaeen
dc.subjectchemistryen
dc.subjectdrug effecten
dc.subjectgerminationen
dc.subjectgrowth, development and agingen
dc.subjecthistologyen
dc.subjectLD 50en
dc.subjectmetabolismen
dc.subjectphysiologyen
dc.subjectplant leafen
dc.subjectplant rooten
dc.subjectplant stomaen
dc.subjectsalt toleranceen
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectBrassicaceaeen
dc.subjectLethal Dose 50en
dc.subjectPlant Leavesen
dc.subjectPlant Rootsen
dc.subjectPlant Stomataen
dc.subjectPotassiumen
dc.subjectSalt-Toleranceen
dc.subjectSodiumen
dc.subjectSodium Chlorideen
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectArabidopsis thalianaen
dc.subjectBarbarea vernaen
dc.subjectCapsella bursa-pastorisen
dc.subjectDescurainia pinnataen
dc.subjectHirschfeldia incanaen
dc.subjectLepidium densiflorumen
dc.subjectLepidium virginicumen
dc.subjectMalcolmiaen
dc.subjectSisymbrium officinaleen
dc.subjectThellungiella parvulaen
dc.subjectThellungiella salsugineaen
dc.subjectThlaspi arvenseen
dc.titleA comparative study of salt tolerance parameters in 11 wild relatives of Arabidopsis thalianaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Stress Genomics Research Laben
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Botanyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2921208en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Agro-environmental Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Viale Fanin 44, I-40127 Bologna, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Plant Environmental Stress Physiology, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Biotechnology, University of Ankara, Tandoan, Ankara 06100, Turkeyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Fruit Tree and Woody Plant Sciences, University of Bologna, Viale Fanin 46, I-40127 Bologna, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Graduate School of Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, South Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Plant Genetics, Via Universita' 133, I-80055 Portici, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory of Plant Cell and Chromosome Engineering, Center of Agricultural Resources, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, 286 Huaizhong Road, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050021, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy, University of Naples Federico II, Via Universit 100, Portici I-80055, Italyen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorBressan, Ray Anthonyen
kaust.authorD'Urzo, Matilde Painoen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.