Large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case report

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325366
Title:
Large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case report
Authors:
YANG, GUANG; LI, CHENGUANG; CHEN, XIN; LIU, YAOHUA; HAN, DAYONG; Gao, Xin ( 0000-0002-7108-3574 ) ; KAWAMOTO, KEIJI; ZHAO, SHIGUANG
Abstract:
The present study reports a rare case of large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign. A 57-year-old female presented with pulsatile tinnitus and episodic vertigo associated with a ten-year history of an intermittent faint headache. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the right petrous bone, which was hypointense on T1-weighted images and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and showed a dural tail sign following gadolinium administration. Pre-operatively, this tumor was believed to be a meningioma. During surgery, the vascular tumor was removed by a modified pterional approach. A histopathological examination indicated that the tumor was a capillary hemangioma. Although intraosseous capillary hemangiomas are rare, they most frequently affect the temporal bone. Hemangiomas of the temporal bone may mimic other more common basal tumors. The diagnosis is most often made during surgical resection. The dural tail sign is not specific for meningioma, as it also occurs in other intracranial or extracranial tumors. The treatment of intratemporal hemangiomas is complete surgical excision, with radiotherapy used for unresectable lesions. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the fourth case of intraosseous intracranial capillary hemangioma, but the largest intratemporal hemangioma to be reported in the literature to date.
KAUST Department:
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
Citation:
Yang G, Li C, Chen X, Liu Y, Han D, et al. (2014) Large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case report. Oncol Lett. doi:10.3892/ol.2014.2143.
Publisher:
Spandidos Publications
Journal:
Oncology Letters
Issue Date:
13-May-2014
DOI:
10.3892/ol.2014.2143
PubMed ID:
24959241
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4063632
Type:
Article
ISSN:
17921082
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYANG, GUANGen
dc.contributor.authorLI, CHENGUANGen
dc.contributor.authorCHEN, XINen
dc.contributor.authorLIU, YAOHUAen
dc.contributor.authorHAN, DAYONGen
dc.contributor.authorGao, Xinen
dc.contributor.authorKAWAMOTO, KEIJIen
dc.contributor.authorZHAO, SHIGUANGen
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:49:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:49:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13en
dc.identifier.citationYang G, Li C, Chen X, Liu Y, Han D, et al. (2014) Large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case report. Oncol Lett. doi:10.3892/ol.2014.2143.en
dc.identifier.issn17921082en
dc.identifier.pmid24959241en
dc.identifier.doi10.3892/ol.2014.2143en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325366en
dc.description.abstractThe present study reports a rare case of large capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign. A 57-year-old female presented with pulsatile tinnitus and episodic vertigo associated with a ten-year history of an intermittent faint headache. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the right petrous bone, which was hypointense on T1-weighted images and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and showed a dural tail sign following gadolinium administration. Pre-operatively, this tumor was believed to be a meningioma. During surgery, the vascular tumor was removed by a modified pterional approach. A histopathological examination indicated that the tumor was a capillary hemangioma. Although intraosseous capillary hemangiomas are rare, they most frequently affect the temporal bone. Hemangiomas of the temporal bone may mimic other more common basal tumors. The diagnosis is most often made during surgical resection. The dural tail sign is not specific for meningioma, as it also occurs in other intracranial or extracranial tumors. The treatment of intratemporal hemangiomas is complete surgical excision, with radiotherapy used for unresectable lesions. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the fourth case of intraosseous intracranial capillary hemangioma, but the largest intratemporal hemangioma to be reported in the literature to date.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpandidos Publicationsen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. The article may be redistributed, reproduced, and reused for non-commercial purposes, provided the original source is properly cited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0en
dc.subjectCapillary hemangiomaen
dc.subjectDural tail signen
dc.subjectIntraosseous hemangiomaen
dc.subjectTemporal boneen
dc.subjectblood clotting factor 8en
dc.subjectgadoliniumen
dc.subjectgadolinium pentetate meglumineen
dc.subjectvimentinen
dc.subjectadulten
dc.subjectbrain hemangiomaen
dc.subjectcancer surgeryen
dc.subjectcapillary hemangiomaen
dc.subjectcase reporten
dc.subjectdura materen
dc.subjectepisodic vertigoen
dc.subjectfollow upen
dc.subjecthistopathologyen
dc.subjecthuman tissueen
dc.subjectimmunohistochemistryen
dc.subjectmiddle ageden
dc.subjectnuclear magnetic resonance imagingen
dc.subjectpetrous boneen
dc.subjectpure tone audiometryen
dc.subjecttemporal bone tumoren
dc.subjecttinnitusen
dc.titleLarge capillary hemangioma of the temporal bone with a dural tail sign: A case reporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalOncology Lettersen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4063632en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Brain Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Neurosurgery, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japanen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorGao, Xinen

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