Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325361
Title:
Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges
Authors:
Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.
Abstract:
Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.
KAUST Department:
Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
Citation:
Sagar S, Kaur M, Minneman KP (2010) Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges. Marine Drugs 8: 2619-2638. doi:10.3390/md8102619.
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Journal:
Marine Drugs
Issue Date:
11-Oct-2010
DOI:
10.3390/md8102619
PubMed ID:
21116410
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2992996
Type:
Article
ISSN:
16603397
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSagar, Sunilen
dc.contributor.authorKaur, Mandeepen
dc.contributor.authorMinneman, Kenneth P.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:49:09Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:49:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10-11en
dc.identifier.citationSagar S, Kaur M, Minneman KP (2010) Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges. Marine Drugs 8: 2619-2638. doi:10.3390/md8102619.en
dc.identifier.issn16603397en
dc.identifier.pmid21116410en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/md8102619en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325361en
dc.description.abstractMarine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AGen
dc.rightsThis article is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0en
dc.subjectAntiviralen
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen
dc.subjectNatural productsen
dc.subjectSpongeen
dc.subject4 methylaaptamineen
dc.subjectacicloviren
dc.subjectantineoplastic agenten
dc.subjectantineoplastic alkaloiden
dc.subjectavarolen
dc.subjectcyclodepsipeptideen
dc.subjectDNA polymeraseen
dc.subjectdragmacidin fen
dc.subjectmanzamine Aen
dc.subjectmicrospinosamideen
dc.subjectmycalamide Aen
dc.subjectmycalamide Ben
dc.subjectnatural producten
dc.subjectorganolead compounden
dc.subjectpapuamide Aen
dc.subjectpapuamide ben
dc.subjectpapuamide Cen
dc.subjectpapuamide Den
dc.subjectunclassified drugen
dc.subjectvidarabineen
dc.subjectAaptosen
dc.subjectantiviral activityen
dc.subjectconcentration responseen
dc.subjectDNA synthesis inhibitionen
dc.subjectdrug isolationen
dc.subjectdrug potencyen
dc.subjectdrug structureen
dc.subjectdrug synthesisen
dc.subjectenzyme inhibitionen
dc.subjectHaliclonaen
dc.subjectHalicortexen
dc.subjectHerpes simplex virusen
dc.subjecthigh throughput screeningen
dc.subjectHuman immunodeficiency virusen
dc.subjectmetagenomicsen
dc.subjectPachypellinaen
dc.subjectreviewen
dc.subjectSidonops microspinosaen
dc.subjectsponge (Porifera)en
dc.subjecttethya cryptaen
dc.subjectTheonellaen
dc.subjectVaccinia virusen
dc.subjectVaricella zoster virusen
dc.subjectvirus infectionen
dc.subjectvirus inhibitionen
dc.subjectvirus resistanceen
dc.subjectvirus strainen
dc.subjectAntiviral Agentsen
dc.subjectAquatic Organismsen
dc.subjectBiotechnologyen
dc.subjectDrug Discoveryen
dc.subjectHerpes Simplexen
dc.subjectHIV Infectionsen
dc.subjectPoriferaen
dc.subjectSimplexvirusen
dc.subjectSymbiosisen
dc.subjectVidarabineen
dc.subjectAraen
dc.subjectHerpesen
dc.subjectHuman herpesvirus 3en
dc.subjectHuman immunodeficiency virusen
dc.subjectSimplexvirusen
dc.subjectTethya cryptaen
dc.titleAntiviral lead compounds from marine spongesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.identifier.journalMarine Drugsen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2992996en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionUnidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales (Puerto Morelos), Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autõnoma de México, Puerto Morelos, QR 77580, Mexicoen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Natural Sciences, University of California Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, CA 95343, United Statesen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorSagar, Sunilen
kaust.authorKaur, Mandeepen
kaust.authorMinneman, Kenneth P.en

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