Diving behavior of the reef manta ray links coral reefs with adjacent deep pelagic habitats

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325333
Title:
Diving behavior of the reef manta ray links coral reefs with adjacent deep pelagic habitats
Authors:
Braun, Camrin D. ( 0000-0002-9317-9489 ) ; Skomal, Gregory B.; Thorrold, Simon R. ( 0000-0002-1533-7517 ) ; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 )
Abstract:
Recent successful efforts to increase protection for manta rays has highlighted the lack of basic ecological information, including vertical and horizontal movement patterns, available for these species. We deployed pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags on nine reef manta rays, Manta alfredi, to determine diving behaviors and vertical habitat use. Transmitted and archived data were obtained from seven tagged mantas over deployment periods of 102-188 days, including three recovered tags containing 2.6 million depth, temperature, and light level data points collected every 10 or 15 seconds. Mantas frequented the upper 10 m during daylight hours and tended to occupy deeper water throughout the night. Six of the seven individuals performed a cumulative 76 deep dives (>150 m) with one individual reaching 432 m, extending the known depth range of this coastal, reef-oriented species and confirming its role as an ecological link between epipelagic and mesopelagic habitats. Mean vertical velocities calculated from high-resolution dive data (62 dives >150 m) from three individuals suggested that mantas may use gliding behavior during travel and that this behavior may prove more efficient than continuous horizontal swimming. The behaviors in this study indicate manta rays provide a previously unknown link between the epi- and mesopelagic layers of an extremely oligotrophic marine environment and provide evidence of a third marine species that utilizes gliding to maximize movement efficiency. © 2014 Braun et al.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Braun CD, Skomal GB, Thorrold SR, Berumen ML (2014) Diving Behavior of the Reef Manta Ray Links Coral Reefs with Adjacent Deep Pelagic Habitats. PLoS ONE 9: e88170. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088170.
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
6-Feb-2014
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0088170
PubMed ID:
24516605
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3916408
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19326203
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBraun, Camrin D.en
dc.contributor.authorSkomal, Gregory B.en
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.en
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:47:31Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:47:31Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02-06en
dc.identifier.citationBraun CD, Skomal GB, Thorrold SR, Berumen ML (2014) Diving Behavior of the Reef Manta Ray Links Coral Reefs with Adjacent Deep Pelagic Habitats. PLoS ONE 9: e88170. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088170.en
dc.identifier.issn19326203en
dc.identifier.pmid24516605en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0088170en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325333en
dc.description.abstractRecent successful efforts to increase protection for manta rays has highlighted the lack of basic ecological information, including vertical and horizontal movement patterns, available for these species. We deployed pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags on nine reef manta rays, Manta alfredi, to determine diving behaviors and vertical habitat use. Transmitted and archived data were obtained from seven tagged mantas over deployment periods of 102-188 days, including three recovered tags containing 2.6 million depth, temperature, and light level data points collected every 10 or 15 seconds. Mantas frequented the upper 10 m during daylight hours and tended to occupy deeper water throughout the night. Six of the seven individuals performed a cumulative 76 deep dives (>150 m) with one individual reaching 432 m, extending the known depth range of this coastal, reef-oriented species and confirming its role as an ecological link between epipelagic and mesopelagic habitats. Mean vertical velocities calculated from high-resolution dive data (62 dives >150 m) from three individuals suggested that mantas may use gliding behavior during travel and that this behavior may prove more efficient than continuous horizontal swimming. The behaviors in this study indicate manta rays provide a previously unknown link between the epi- and mesopelagic layers of an extremely oligotrophic marine environment and provide evidence of a third marine species that utilizes gliding to maximize movement efficiency. © 2014 Braun et al.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectanimal behavioren
dc.subjectcartilaginous fishen
dc.subjectcoral reefen
dc.subjectdiel vertical migrationen
dc.subjectdiving behavioren
dc.subjectgeographic distributionen
dc.subjecthabitaten
dc.subjecthabitat useen
dc.subjectlighten
dc.subjectManta alfredien
dc.subjectmarine biologyen
dc.subjectmoonen
dc.subjectpelagic speciesen
dc.subjectsatellite telemetryen
dc.subjectswimmingen
dc.subjecttelemetryen
dc.subjecttrend studyen
dc.subjectvelocityen
dc.subjectwater temperatureen
dc.titleDiving behavior of the reef manta ray links coral reefs with adjacent deep pelagic habitatsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3916408en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionMassachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, New Bedford, MA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorBraun, Camrin D.en
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en

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