A barcode of organellar genome polymorphisms identifies the geographic origin of Plasmodium falciparum strains

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325324
Title:
A barcode of organellar genome polymorphisms identifies the geographic origin of Plasmodium falciparum strains
Authors:
Preston, Mark D.; Campino, Susana; Assefa, Samuel A.; Echeverry, Diego F.; Ocholla, Harold; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Stewart, Lindsay B.; Conway, David J.; Borrmann, Steffen; Michon, Pascal; Zongo, Issaka; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Nosten, Francois; Pain, Arnab ( 0000-0002-1755-2819 ) ; Bousema, Teun; Drakeley, Chris J.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Sutherland, Colin J.; Roper, Cally; Clark, Taane G.
Abstract:
Malaria is a major public health problem that is actively being addressed in a global eradication campaign. Increased population mobility through international air travel has elevated the risk of re-introducing parasites to elimination areas and dispersing drug-resistant parasites to new regions. A simple genetic marker that quickly and accurately identifies the geographic origin of infections would be a valuable public health tool for locating the source of imported outbreaks. Here we analyse the mitochondrion and apicoplast genomes of 711 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from 14 countries, and find evidence that they are non-recombining and co-inherited. The high degree of linkage produces a panel of relatively few single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that is geographically informative. We design a 23-SNP barcode that is highly predictive (?92%) and easily adapted to aid case management in the field and survey parasite migration worldwide. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
KAUST Department:
Pathogen Genomics Laboratory
Citation:
Preston MD, Campino S, Assefa SA, Echeverry DF, Ocholla H, et al. (2014) A barcode of organellar genome polymorphisms identifies the geographic origin of Plasmodium falciparum strains. Nature Communications 5. doi:10.1038/ncomms5052.
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Nature Communications
Issue Date:
13-Jun-2014
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5052
PubMed ID:
24923250
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4082634
Type:
Article
ISSN:
20411723
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Mark D.en
dc.contributor.authorCampino, Susanaen
dc.contributor.authorAssefa, Samuel A.en
dc.contributor.authorEcheverry, Diego F.en
dc.contributor.authorOcholla, Harolden
dc.contributor.authorAmambua-Ngwa, Alfreden
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Lindsay B.en
dc.contributor.authorConway, David J.en
dc.contributor.authorBorrmann, Steffenen
dc.contributor.authorMichon, Pascalen
dc.contributor.authorZongo, Issakaen
dc.contributor.authorOuédraogo, Jean-Boscoen
dc.contributor.authorDjimde, Abdoulaye A.en
dc.contributor.authorDoumbo, Ogobara K.en
dc.contributor.authorNosten, Francoisen
dc.contributor.authorPain, Arnaben
dc.contributor.authorBousema, Teunen
dc.contributor.authorDrakeley, Chris J.en
dc.contributor.authorFairhurst, Rick M.en
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Colin J.en
dc.contributor.authorRoper, Callyen
dc.contributor.authorClark, Taane G.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:47:00Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:47:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-13en
dc.identifier.citationPreston MD, Campino S, Assefa SA, Echeverry DF, Ocholla H, et al. (2014) A barcode of organellar genome polymorphisms identifies the geographic origin of Plasmodium falciparum strains. Nature Communications 5. doi:10.1038/ncomms5052.en
dc.identifier.issn20411723en
dc.identifier.pmid24923250en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms5052en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325324en
dc.description.abstractMalaria is a major public health problem that is actively being addressed in a global eradication campaign. Increased population mobility through international air travel has elevated the risk of re-introducing parasites to elimination areas and dispersing drug-resistant parasites to new regions. A simple genetic marker that quickly and accurately identifies the geographic origin of infections would be a valuable public health tool for locating the source of imported outbreaks. Here we analyse the mitochondrion and apicoplast genomes of 711 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from 14 countries, and find evidence that they are non-recombining and co-inherited. The high degree of linkage produces a panel of relatively few single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that is geographically informative. We design a 23-SNP barcode that is highly predictive (?92%) and easily adapted to aid case management in the field and survey parasite migration worldwide. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en
dc.subjectaccuracyen
dc.subjectalleleen
dc.subjectapicoplasten
dc.subjectBurkina Fasoen
dc.subjectCambodiaen
dc.subjectcase managementen
dc.subjectcloneen
dc.subjectColombiaen
dc.subjectDNA barcodingen
dc.subjectGambiaen
dc.subjectgene frequencyen
dc.subjectgenetic linkageen
dc.subjectgenetic markeren
dc.subjectgeographic originen
dc.subjectGhanaen
dc.subjecthaplotypeen
dc.subjectinheritanceen
dc.subjectKenyaen
dc.subjectMalawien
dc.subjectMalien
dc.subjectmicrobial genomeen
dc.subjectmitochondrionen
dc.subjectmutationen
dc.subjectPapua New Guineaen
dc.subjectparasite migrationen
dc.subjectPeruen
dc.subjectPlasmodium falciparumen
dc.subjectpopulation differentiationen
dc.subjectpredictive valueen
dc.subjectsingle nucleotide polymorphismen
dc.subjectspeciesen
dc.subjectThailanden
dc.subjecttravelen
dc.subjectUgandaen
dc.subjectViet Namen
dc.titleA barcode of organellar genome polymorphisms identifies the geographic origin of Plasmodium falciparum strainsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPathogen Genomics Laboratoryen
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4082634en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionImmunology and Infection Department, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionMalaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionInternational Center for Medical Research and Training, Carerra 125, Cali, Colombiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre 3, Malawien
dc.contributor.institutionMalawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, Blantyre 30096 BT3, Malawien
dc.contributor.institutionMalaria Capacity Development Consortium, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool L3 5QA, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionMedical Research Council Laboratories (UK), PO Box 273, Fajara, Gambiaen
dc.contributor.institutionKEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kilifi 80108, Kenyaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Parasitology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, University of Tbingen, Tbingen 72074, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Rural Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, DivineWord University, PO Box 483, Madang, Papua New Guineaen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut de Recherche en Sciences de la Sant, BP 545, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Fasoen
dc.contributor.institutionMalaria Research and Training Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Dentistry, University of Bamako, Bamako BP1805, Malien
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionShoklo Malaria Research Unit, Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Mahidol University, Mae Sot 63110, Thailanden
dc.contributor.institutionMalaria Pathogenesis and Human Immunity Unit, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, United Statesen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorNosten, Francoisen

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