Remote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Sea

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325315
Title:
Remote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Sea
Authors:
Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Pradhan, Yaswant; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L. ( 0000-0001-9033-4925 ) ; Hoteit, Ibrahim ( 0000-0002-3751-4393 )
Abstract:
The Red Sea holds one of the most diverse marine ecosystems, primarily due to coral reefs. However, knowledge on large-scale phytoplankton dynamics is limited. Analysis of a 10-year high resolution Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) dataset, along with remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and wind, provided a detailed description of the spatiotemporal seasonal succession of phytoplankton biomass in the Red Sea. Based on MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data, four distinct Red Sea provinces and seasons are suggested, covering the major patterns of surface phytoplankton production. The Red Sea Chl-a depicts a distinct seasonality with maximum concentrations seen during the winter time (attributed to vertical mixing in the north and wind-induced horizontal intrusion of nutrient-rich water in the south), and minimum concentrations during the summer (associated with strong seasonal stratification). The initiation of the seasonal succession occurs in autumn and lasts until early spring. However, weekly Chl-a seasonal succession data revealed that during the month of June, consistent anti-cyclonic eddies transfer nutrients and/or Chl-a to the open waters of the central Red Sea. This phenomenon occurs during the stratified nutrient depleted season, and thus could provide an important source of nutrients to the open waters. Remotely-sensed synoptic observations highlight that Chl-a does not increase regularly from north to south as previously thought. The Northern part of the Central Red Sea province appears to be the most oligotrophic area (opposed to southern and northern domains). This is likely due to the absence of strong mixing, which is apparent at the northern end of the Red Sea, and low nutrient intrusion in comparison with the southern end. Although the Red Sea is considered an oligotrophic sea, sporadic blooms occur that reach mesotrophic levels. The water temperature and the prevailing winds control the nutrient concentrations within the euphotic zone and enable the horizontal transportation of nutrients. © 2013 Raitsos et al.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program
Citation:
Raitsos DE, Pradhan Y, Brewin RJW, Stenchikov G, Hoteit I (2013) Remote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Sea. PLoS ONE 8: e64909. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064909.
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
5-Jun-2013
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0064909
PubMed ID:
23755161
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3674012
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19326203
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRaitsos, Dionysios E.en
dc.contributor.authorPradhan, Yaswanten
dc.contributor.authorBrewin, Robert J. W.en
dc.contributor.authorStenchikov, Georgiy L.en
dc.contributor.authorHoteit, Ibrahimen
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:46:34Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:46:34Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06-05en
dc.identifier.citationRaitsos DE, Pradhan Y, Brewin RJW, Stenchikov G, Hoteit I (2013) Remote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Sea. PLoS ONE 8: e64909. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064909.en
dc.identifier.issn19326203en
dc.identifier.pmid23755161en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0064909en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325315en
dc.description.abstractThe Red Sea holds one of the most diverse marine ecosystems, primarily due to coral reefs. However, knowledge on large-scale phytoplankton dynamics is limited. Analysis of a 10-year high resolution Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) dataset, along with remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and wind, provided a detailed description of the spatiotemporal seasonal succession of phytoplankton biomass in the Red Sea. Based on MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data, four distinct Red Sea provinces and seasons are suggested, covering the major patterns of surface phytoplankton production. The Red Sea Chl-a depicts a distinct seasonality with maximum concentrations seen during the winter time (attributed to vertical mixing in the north and wind-induced horizontal intrusion of nutrient-rich water in the south), and minimum concentrations during the summer (associated with strong seasonal stratification). The initiation of the seasonal succession occurs in autumn and lasts until early spring. However, weekly Chl-a seasonal succession data revealed that during the month of June, consistent anti-cyclonic eddies transfer nutrients and/or Chl-a to the open waters of the central Red Sea. This phenomenon occurs during the stratified nutrient depleted season, and thus could provide an important source of nutrients to the open waters. Remotely-sensed synoptic observations highlight that Chl-a does not increase regularly from north to south as previously thought. The Northern part of the Central Red Sea province appears to be the most oligotrophic area (opposed to southern and northern domains). This is likely due to the absence of strong mixing, which is apparent at the northern end of the Red Sea, and low nutrient intrusion in comparison with the southern end. Although the Red Sea is considered an oligotrophic sea, sporadic blooms occur that reach mesotrophic levels. The water temperature and the prevailing winds control the nutrient concentrations within the euphotic zone and enable the horizontal transportation of nutrients. © 2013 Raitsos et al.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS ONEen
dc.subjectchlorophyllen
dc.subjectautumnen
dc.subjectbiomass productionen
dc.subjectgeographic distributionen
dc.subjectnutrient availabilityen
dc.subjectnutrient concentrationen
dc.subjectnutrient limitationen
dc.subjectnutrient uptakeen
dc.subjectphytoplanktonen
dc.subjectremote sensingen
dc.subjectseasonal variationen
dc.subjectspringen
dc.subjectstratificationen
dc.subjectsummeren
dc.subjectwinteren
dc.subjectAnthozoaen
dc.titleRemote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Seaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3674012en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionRemote Sensing Group (RSG), Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML), Plymouth, Devon, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.institutionMet Office, FitzRoy Road, Exeter, United Kingdomen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorRaitsos, Dionysios E.en
kaust.authorStenchikov, Georgiy L.en
kaust.authorHoteit, Ibrahimen

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