Community Change within a Caribbean Coral Reef Marine Protected Area following Two Decades of Local Management

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325310
Title:
Community Change within a Caribbean Coral Reef Marine Protected Area following Two Decades of Local Management
Authors:
Noble, Mae M.; van Laake, Gregoor; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 ) ; Fulton, Christopher J.
Abstract:
Structural change in both the habitat and reef-associated fish assemblages within spatially managed coral reefs can provide key insights into the benefits and limitations of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). While MPA zoning effects on particular target species are well reported, we are yet to fully resolve the various affects of spatial management on the structure of coral reef communities over decadal time scales. Here, we document mixed affects of MPA zoning on fish density, biomass and species richness over the 21 years since establishment of the Saba Marine Park (SMP). Although we found significantly greater biomass and species richness of reef-associated fishes within shallow habitats (5 meters depth) closed to fishing, this did not hold for deeper (15 m) habitats, and there was a widespread decline (38% decrease) in live hard coral cover and a 68% loss of carnivorous reef fishes across all zones of the SMP from the 1990s to 2008. Given the importance of live coral for the maintenance and replenishment of reef fishes, and the likely role of chronic disturbance in driving coral decline across the region, we explore how local spatial management can help protect coral reef ecosystems within the context of large-scale environmental pressures and disturbances outside the purview of local MPA management. © 2013 Noble et al.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Noble MM, van Laake G, Berumen ML, Fulton CJ (2013) Community Change within a Caribbean Coral Reef Marine Protected Area following Two Decades of Local Management. PLoS ONE 8: e54069. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054069.
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Issue Date:
14-Jan-2013
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0054069
PubMed ID:
23342078
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3544719
Type:
Article
ISSN:
19326203
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNoble, Mae M.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Laake, Gregooren
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorFulton, Christopher J.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:46:18Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:46:18Zen
dc.date.issued2013-01-14en
dc.identifier.citationNoble MM, van Laake G, Berumen ML, Fulton CJ (2013) Community Change within a Caribbean Coral Reef Marine Protected Area following Two Decades of Local Management. PLoS ONE 8: e54069. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054069.en
dc.identifier.issn19326203en
dc.identifier.pmid23342078en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0054069en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325310en
dc.description.abstractStructural change in both the habitat and reef-associated fish assemblages within spatially managed coral reefs can provide key insights into the benefits and limitations of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). While MPA zoning effects on particular target species are well reported, we are yet to fully resolve the various affects of spatial management on the structure of coral reef communities over decadal time scales. Here, we document mixed affects of MPA zoning on fish density, biomass and species richness over the 21 years since establishment of the Saba Marine Park (SMP). Although we found significantly greater biomass and species richness of reef-associated fishes within shallow habitats (5 meters depth) closed to fishing, this did not hold for deeper (15 m) habitats, and there was a widespread decline (38% decrease) in live hard coral cover and a 68% loss of carnivorous reef fishes across all zones of the SMP from the 1990s to 2008. Given the importance of live coral for the maintenance and replenishment of reef fishes, and the likely role of chronic disturbance in driving coral decline across the region, we explore how local spatial management can help protect coral reef ecosystems within the context of large-scale environmental pressures and disturbances outside the purview of local MPA management. © 2013 Noble et al.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS ONEen
dc.subjectbiomassen
dc.subjectCentral Americaen
dc.subjectcoralen
dc.subjectcoral reefen
dc.subjectenvironmental changeen
dc.subjectenvironmental impacten
dc.subjectenvironmental managementen
dc.subjectenvironmental protectionen
dc.subjectfishen
dc.subjecthabitaten
dc.subjectmarine protected areaen
dc.subjectpopulation densityen
dc.subjectspecies richnessen
dc.subjectCaribbean Regionen
dc.subjectConservation of Natural Resourcesen
dc.subjectCoral Reefsen
dc.subjectEcosystemen
dc.subjectFishesen
dc.subjectAnthozoaen
dc.subjectPiscesen
dc.titleCommunity Change within a Caribbean Coral Reef Marine Protected Area following Two Decades of Local Managementen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3544719en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Saba Conservation Foundation, The Bottom, Saba, Netherlands Antillesen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United Statesen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en

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