Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/325250
Title:
Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress
Authors:
Yun, Kil-Young; Park, Myoung Ryoul; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Herath, Venura; Xu, Fuyu; Mauleon, Ramil; Wijaya, Edward; Bajic, Vladimir B. ( 0000-0001-5435-4750 ) ; Bruskiewich, Richard; de los Reyes, Benildo G
Abstract:
Background: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
Citation:
Yun K-Y, Park MR, Mohanty B, Herath V, Xu F, et al. (2010) Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress. BMC Plant Biol 10: 16. doi:10.1186/1471-2229-10-16.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
BMC Plant Biology
Issue Date:
25-Jan-2010
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2229-10-16
PubMed ID:
20100339
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2826336
Type:
Article
ISSN:
14712229
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYun, Kil-Youngen
dc.contributor.authorPark, Myoung Ryoulen
dc.contributor.authorMohanty, Bijayalaxmien
dc.contributor.authorHerath, Venuraen
dc.contributor.authorXu, Fuyuen
dc.contributor.authorMauleon, Ramilen
dc.contributor.authorWijaya, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorBajic, Vladimir B.en
dc.contributor.authorBruskiewich, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorde los Reyes, Benildo Gen
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T09:42:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-27T09:42:26Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-25en
dc.identifier.citationYun K-Y, Park MR, Mohanty B, Herath V, Xu F, et al. (2010) Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress. BMC Plant Biol 10: 16. doi:10.1186/1471-2229-10-16.en
dc.identifier.issn14712229en
dc.identifier.pmid20100339en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2229-10-16en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/325250en
dc.description.abstractBackground: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0en
dc.subjectArabidopsisen
dc.subjectJaponicaen
dc.subjecthydrogen peroxideen
dc.subjectplant RNAen
dc.subjecttranscription factoren
dc.subjectvegetable proteinen
dc.subjectcolden
dc.subjectDNA microarrayen
dc.subjectgene expression profilingen
dc.subjectgene expression regulationen
dc.subjectgene regulatory networken
dc.subjectgeneticsen
dc.subjectgrowth, development and agingen
dc.subjectmetabolismen
dc.subjectoxidation reduction reactionen
dc.subjectoxidative stressen
dc.subjectpromoter regionen
dc.subjectriceen
dc.subjectsignal transductionen
dc.subjectCold Temperatureen
dc.subjectGene Expression Profilingen
dc.subjectGene Expression Regulation, Planten
dc.subjectGene Regulatory Networksen
dc.subjectHydrogen Peroxideen
dc.subjectOligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysisen
dc.subjectOryza sativaen
dc.subjectOxidation-Reductionen
dc.subjectOxidative Stressen
dc.subjectPlant Proteinsen
dc.subjectPromoter Regions, Geneticen
dc.subjectRNA, Planten
dc.subjectSignal Transductionen
dc.subjectTranscription Factorsen
dc.titleTranscriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stressen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)en
dc.identifier.journalBMC Plant Biologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2826336en
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSouth African National Bioinformatics Institute, University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535, South Africaen
dc.contributor.institutionCrop Research Informatics Laboratory, International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippinesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576, Singaporeen
dc.contributor.institutionComputational Biology Research Center, AIST Tokyo Waterfront, 2-41-6 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japanen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorBajic, Vladimir B.en

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